Latest forum posts

  • posted by  Steve Maggs on Just started – skin feeling hot all over
    on in Newbies
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    So, I’ve started some aspects of the diet including more fermented foods and 5:2. My first week.

    Previously I had ezcma, asthma, candida rashes like athletes foot and nail fungus. Hence why I thought this might help.

    Only thing is, since starting this I kind of feel hot all over and my skin feels flushed. Not particularly unpleasant. Is this normal? I’m just not sure what it means? Is there like a war going on in my stomach between the various gut bacteria??

    Appreciate any thoughts. Sometimes it’s weird working out whats going on. If only we could speak to our gut flora friends!!

  • posted by  Ding on Potato Starch
    on in Stress, sleep and mindfulness
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    I’d sound a note of caution regarding long-term use of potato starch, if you google potato starch colon cancer you’ll see what I mean. It may be best rather than taking it as a drink to incorporate it in a meal with some form of fibre to help it get tomthe right part of your guts.

  • posted by  IKeeptrying on VSL#3
    on in Probiotics
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    I got mine from Dennis the chemist – they arrived a day later.

  • posted by  IKeeptrying on Forum Help
    on in Welcome
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    I’m not sure about the forum yet, it’s early days still. What’s a phpBB type forum? I’ve been on the blood sugar diet forum although not very actively posting and that seems ok. I also dallied with the 5:2 forum and that seems lively and fast moving. There’s a 5:2 and a BSD forum on mumsnet – I’m an aged mumsnetter !! They are quite quite lively – the forums, that is

  • posted by  IKeeptrying on British Gut Project
    on in Welcome
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    I’ve also got the kit to do the test and then I got a bad cold and didn’t do it – I may do it and send it off.
    I read Tim Spector book the Diet Myth it’s very enlightening. I also read an article in my google searches that the only approach that Tim Spector advocates is a Mediterranean diet with intermittent fasting. I’ll post the link if anyone is interested in it

  • posted by  Aquilegia on Forum Help
    on in Welcome
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    Sorry for posting this in the welcome section, but it appears that several of my posts have ‘disappeared’.

    This has happened in the Prebiotic forum. Both with my reply to a topic and also a new post about Bimuno. Not sure if you have enabled forum ‘flood control’ and this has prevented it appearing or it has just got lost in the ether?

    (Incidentally, I don’t find this forum that user friendly. Have you ever thought about incorporating a phpBB type forum?)

  • posted by  Aquilegia on VSL#3
    on in Probiotics
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    You can buy VSL#3 Probiotics from here: https://www.vsl3.co.uk/

    Or you buy it from your local Lloyds Pharmacy (they keep it in their fridge).

    Personally, I wouldn’t buy it from anywhere else, although there are sellers on amazon etc. It needs to be shipped in a chilled package and direct from the fridge. Also, VSL ship via tracked next day delivery.

    Hope this helps.

  • posted by  Aquilegia on Prebiotic supplements
    on in Prebiotics
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    okay, so I’ve twice typed and submitted a post in this thread with the link to Bimuno prebiotics but neither have appeared!

  • posted by  Wilko on New to fermenting
    on in Fermenting
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    All those new to fermenting and Kefir making, I would highly recommend the Facebook group – UK fermenting friends. They are well established and an excellent kefir grains sharing resource. I currently make my own milk kefir, sauerkraut and I’m starting to experiment with more fermented veggies.

  • posted by  Momilsom on HOWARU PTOBIOTICS
    on in Prebiotics
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    Where can I buy these in the U.K. Only ones coming up are in USA or New Zealand. Thanks Maureen Milsom

  • posted by  Pia Winberg on Seaweed?
    on in Prebiotics
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    Well you are asking a supplier of seaweed food and capsules – so my answer would be yes! But for you to be able to make your own informed decision, you would have to have trust in the brand/company (there are many supplement companies that are not trustworthy as it is a notoriously unregulated market, but then there are good ones), then you will need to look for the evidence behind the active ingredient (the company should lead you to research from their website to demonstrate the benefits), and you will want to know that it comes from a clean and well managed coastline (seaweed can suck up industrial pollutants that you don’t want). The main issue is that this is such a new area of rediscovered knowledge, the markets and products have not kept up. There are a number of simply milled seaweeds in capsules on the market, but not many yet with the concentrated dietary fibre component with science behind it – but watch this space as there will be soon. Importantly if you buy any seaweed in capsules or powdered form as a supplement and it seems to be a brown kelp, then you just need to make sure that you are not overdosing for iodine. Some kelps concentrate iodine from seawater way too much for them to be edible in quantities everyday that make it useful as a dietary fibre (notably Kombu (Laminaria or Sugar kelp)). These are still good sources for trace elements, and they can have certain pigments (phenolics), that can also be good for the gut in other ways than the fibres. But the source and the function of the supplements should be made clear by the company/brand. Many other seaweeds from clean coastlines you can eat abundantly and they don’t accumulate iodine so much, notable the green, sea lettuce types. A little bit of seaweed every day in anything you can is a good practice, and supplements can help too, but ask the company to give you the information you need to trust them.

  • posted by  Boofla on Seaweed?
    on in Prebiotics
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    Are there good and bad types of seaweed fibre supplements to look out for?

  • posted by  Elise Mann on Welcome to Clever Guts!
    on in Welcome
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    Hi, there’s a tab at the top for recipes and you can submit your own – probably better than a forum strand, as it is more formatted and lets you add lots of info. I’m going to put in a few of mine when I can find time.

  • posted by  Elise Mann on British Gut Project
    on in Welcome
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    I remember thinking about doing this but was laid up at the time after an accident, then forgot about it. Do you have a link to the project, assuming it’s still on-going? Thanks.

  • posted by  Pia Winberg on Seaweed?
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    If you get the seaweed in your diet then that is all you need – like for all things nutritional. But seaweed capsules are good when you can’t keep up with nutrition through food intake or want to concentrate and fill in your nutritional gap that is missing – like prebiotics. So things that you know you aren’t getting enough of (and the west is 50% deficient in dietary fibres), then quality capsules with evidence behind the effects will help. But the easiest way is to keep a jar of dried seaweed by the stove and just throw a little bit into everything – not just the miso soup – unless you eat miso soup everyday!

  • posted by  Helen in North Wales on Welcome to Clever Guts!
    on in Welcome
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    Hi I Keep Trying
    Yes, I think Clever Gits would be an excellent collective name for us all! ๐Ÿ˜„
    Well done you! You have gone for it! Really inspiring and impressive, especially the bike riding just after you’ve dislocated your shoulder. It’s always quite daunting and overwhelming starting a new way of eating, working out what to eat, and how to make the diet work for you, especially when you already have huge limits on what you are able to eat. I think it’s important to eat foods in this diet that you really enjoy as much as possible, so that you don’t feel deprived or denied, and to give yourself little treats along the way, to keep your spirits up. I treat myself to a nice cup of coffee in the bath, with a good book from the library, when I’m feeling a bit low, it really makes me feel good. Also, watching a good film is a pick me up. Whatever works to keep yourself positive. And I remind myself that this food is healing me, and nourishing me, so that I don’t feel resentful about missing out on junk food during the craving moments. You deserve to do well with this diet, and I really hope you get some fabulous results. I am making very small, tentative changes, taking my time, as I’m so afraid that any change might make my symptoms worse. But any change in the right direction is good progress. Keep up the good work!

  • posted by  Tarabiome on British Gut Project
    on in Welcome
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    I am a big fan of Tim (akaTom in the book) Spector and so I invested in citizen science and contributed a stool sample 18 months ago for analysis for the British Gut Project.

    I now have a profile and list that I bearly understand but would love to discuss my results more.

    Anyone else in the same position or know any good resources to help me?
    Tara

  • posted by  Ding on Nightshade Intolerances and Depression
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    Having tried to increase my intake of resistant starch by adding cold potatoes to my lunchtime salad I noticed that I felt seriously depressed later in the afternoon, whilst my initial presumption was that this was caused by a drop in seratonin during the climb down from the carb intake I wondered if this could actually be a symptom of a nightshade intolerance.

    Interested to hear other opinions, especially from those undertaking the potato starch experiment.

  • posted by  Ding on Potato starch
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Start slowly! Mix a teaspoon into a glass of water and drink it. I think you can build up to a couple of tablespoons a day but if you go in at the high end you risk gut trouble.

  • posted by  Turnerlmj on Sourcing quality food
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Hello. Where does everyone source their food (apart from the usual supermarkets). I’m interested in good quality salmon and olive oil.

    Thanks!

  • posted by  IKeeptrying on Welcome to Clever Guts!
    on in Welcome
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    Hi
    There’s quite a few of us clever gutters here now – I accidentally typed clever grits and thought that was quite amusing we could name ourselves the clever gits
    I’m wondering how everyone is doing so far. Im still trying to get my head round the whole programme. I got my delivery of VSL#3 this morning so will start that tomorrow Ive tried to work out a shopping list of things I’ll need and am heading off to my local a health food shop and supermarket tomorrow
    I’m working on cutting out wheat and sugar and trying to follow a Mediterranean diet. I’ve also been on my bike which is progress as I dislocated my shoulder 2 months ago so was a little worried my ligaments weren’t strong enough to support my shoulder

  • posted by  Barbara 123 on Prebiotic supplements
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Hi, I believe the one that the Doc was using was bimuno.It looked like it anyway. I used to take it, but my chemist stopped selling it. It’s galactose oligosaccharides, the same sort of fibre that’s in beans if memory serves. I just looked at Amazon as you made me think I might order some, but the powder type that I used to use is out of stock at the moment. Possibly because everyone saw that programme! Hopefully it’ll be in stock again soon. Hope that helps.

  • posted by  richwnewman on Prebiotic supplements
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Thanks for the responses.

    It looks like these are probiotic supplements. I was actually looking for prebiotics.
    Thanks for the help.

  • posted by  Aquilegia on Prebiotic supplements
    on in Prebiotics
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    Yes, VSL#3, that’s the one I use – one sachet a day mixed in water or in food – i.e. yoghurt.

    I recommend buying direct from their website or from Lloyds Pharmacy (they keep it in the fridge so you might have to ask) just to make sure you’re getting the authentic product. It is despatched from VSL via next day delivery and in a chilled and insulated box.

  • posted by  IKeeptrying on Prebiotic supplements
    on in Prebiotics
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    In his book Michael Mosley recommends VSL# 3
    I believe the one he used on the BBC prog about sleep was biome or something similar sounding

  • posted by  IKeeptrying on Potato Starch
    on in Stress, sleep and mindfulness
    permalink

    That’s interesting, Midas and good that you’re sleeping better. I’m an insomniac and find when I’mve not slept well I lose all motivation for dieting or eating healthily.
    Where do you buy potato starch from or how do you make it?

  • posted by  Helen in North Wales on Welcome to Clever Guts!
    on in Welcome
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    Great book, exactly what I have been talking about to my dietician (who also agrees) and my gastro consultant (who is a sceptic, and of the “anxiety” causes gut problems thinking, which is not helpful!).
    Apologies for next bit; don’t like to moan on about my ailments, but just in case anybody recognises themselves or someone they know with the same symptoms, it just might be helpful!
    Am 49 year old woman, who has had food sensitivities since my early 20’s, of what I didn’t know at the time but now understand to be “oxalates”. I used to become profoundly ill after ingesting food containing high levels of oxalates, e.g. Curry, ground coffee, chilli, strawberries, spinach and beetroot. I have just avoided all these foods most of my adult life.
    When I was pregnant at 40, suddenly became extremely ill with debilitating headaches, agonising sinus pain, and general severe pain throughout my body, prolonged vomiting and days of exhaustion. This went on for the next 5 years; I was so ill, I barely left the house, could not socialise and could not work. I never realised all these symptoms could be related to food, until I read an article from the Daily Mail my friend passed to me, written by Dr Clare Morrison, about oxalates. When I cut out oxalates from my diet, my symptoms disappeared, to my absolute joy! Coincidentally, my acute asthma also disappeared at this exact time, which was the cause for all the antibiotics over the years, ironically. (Is it possible that oxalates contributed to my asthma?!?!)
    However, my intolerance to oxalate has slowly become worse, and I can now only ingest very small amounts of apple, broccoli, courgette, peas and melon without becoming profoundly ill for several days. I have recently had a perforated bowel, but luckily managed to avoid surgery (after iv antibiotics, and a further 2 weeks of antibiotics!!)!
    I believe the root of my intolerances stems from having a leaky gut, caused by extensive antibiotic use, and will be using this book and the advice within to try and heal my gut.
    Agree with some comments above that some advice, e.g. recommended brand of probiotics to use, is not available on this website as directed in the book.
    But so happy and so relieved that research and information about gut microbiome is finally being researched in depth, and fantastic books like this are being written. Am having my poo analysed in the near future, via Human Food Project. The work and research being done by Jeff Leach is very interesting, and I urge you to read of his work and research with the diet of the Hazda tribe in Tanzania.
    Really think Michael Mosley is onto something here. Good luck everyone with your future endeavours to heal your guts; it won’t be easy, but will be most definitely worthwhile.

  • posted by  Chocolate_ee on Welcome to Clever Guts!
    on in Welcome
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    I’d love to have the poo analyis done ( never thought I’d see myself typing that message to people I’ve never met before ! ) but likewise , just discovere that Ubiome don’t do this for the UK. Tried looking elseweher and saw a Kings College crowd funded research programme offering similar. Had anyone tried that ? Expensive as you have to ‘donate’ and then you get something called ‘perks ( which is apparently how these crowd funded things work ) dependent on the level of your ‘donation’. Don’t want to part with hard eearned case before finding out a little more so just wondered if anyone else has participated.

  • posted by  Fizzy Lizzy on Kefir
    on in Welcome
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    Someone mentioned this in a topic somewhere, but I cannot find it again…….. I do find the website a bit tricky to navigate but the book is great! Anyway, since watching one of the programmes about Kefir, I have been making it for myself. I bought my first lot of course but since then, it has grown enormously and I have been able to pass some on to friends and my local Physiotherapist too.

    It is so easy, just so long as you remember it must be organic milk and plastic used when straining or stirring it. It is really tasty and hopefully, is helping my Old Friends to prosper. Plus, maybe adding a few more? I am going to incorporate more of the things mentioned in Michael’s book too, as no point in putting good bacteria in the gut if one doesn’t then feed it properly!

    So, don’t hesitate, buy some and get making for your family too. I have six dogs and they all get a small drink of Kefir milk every other day. They all line up in great anticipation – I’m sure they know it is doing them good.

  • posted by  richwnewman on Prebiotic supplements
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    In his recent BBC programme on sleep, Dr Mosley used a prebiotic supplement. I wanted to try one of these. Is there a dose or brand that anyone could recommend?
    Thanks

  • posted by  Chocolate_ee on Hurray !
    on in Newbies
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    Thank you IKeeptrying ( I keep trying too ! ) . I’ve been absolutely facinated by the book and I’m re-reading it all over again. The scince is quite daunting ( for a non-scientist ) but so well written and in layman’s terms that I can still get my head around it – just don’t think I’ll ever be able to remember pronounce let alone remember half of the names. Thanks for your post – off to download that now.

  • posted by  Alice.B. on Welcome to Clever Guts!
    on in Welcome
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    Good morning. I finished the book last night and do see the point of this approach. A lot of the foods for “The Old Friends”- fermented foods and live yoghurt- were a staple for the generation of my grandparents, but of course we have now forgotten about them.
    I’ve had various stomach issues for years, so have decided to start the 4-week re-booting phase. I will cut out:
    – added sugar
    – gluten
    – milk (but not cheese, sorry)
    – alcohol (I may have one glass per week, if needed socially)

    Cutting pulses is not a problem as I hardly ever eat them (my stomach reacts really badly to them). Broccoli does not affect me, so will not cut out. I will not cut out coffee completely, but will stick to one cup or two cups a day, without milk.

    With a bit of planning, it should be doable. Good luck to everyone starting on this regime.

    It would be good, when this forum develops, to have a thread where people share recipes, actually. I don’t eat meat, for example, which limits my options even further- and would be interested in quick and easy ideas for lunch/dinner.

  • posted by  Rich55 on Welcome to Clever Guts!
    on in Welcome
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    Love the new book, but wondering about the suitability of the Clever Guts diet for my condition.

    I have daily acid reflux (mostly a hoarse/sore throat) so wondered if the diet might help with this particular condition. Any other reflux sufferers out there? Also, the diet is not recommended for those underweight … and I’m about a stone under where I should be. Again, not sure how easy it is to adapt the diet, other than obviously adding extra portions.

    Be great to know if anyone starts this diet and has any suggestions based on these topics.