Latest forum posts

  • I have struggled with gut health namely leaky gut syndrome, since 1998 and can sympathize with not feeling well. You mentioned using antibiotics and probably know that they kill off the good bacteria in the gut. A high count probiotic is one supplement that will begin to replace the good bacteria. There are some very informative articles published on PubMed, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc that talk about leaky gut, gut microbiota and the gut-brain connection. I’ve picked up on it that studies show a correlation between intolerances, auto immune disease and gut health. A good naturopathic doctor or a doctor who uses integrative medicine will be able to get you going fully in the right direction.
    Diet and good water are two basic key elements toward returning to optimum health. As for me, I mostly eat gluten free, sugar free, corn free and dairy free and use organic, non GMO foods incorporating as many raw vegetables as possible. I’m careful to stay away from any foods containing nitrates which are found in cured meats. As far as meats go, I mostly use chicken and turkey and fish, if it’s available. One thing I never drink is sodas. I’ve found them to be pretty rough on me.

  • Hi, I am unsure if anyone can help but I have recently been diagnosed with eoe, an auto immune which is caused from a food allergy.

    In the process of trying to find out what foods I found out I have salicylate and amines intolerance and low zinc that hasn’t changed after months of taking supplements. I am gathering that I have leaky gut due to antibiotic use for chronic sinus infections. I have had 70 head colds followed by sinus infections in last six years (sinus problems are also related to salicylate intolerance). I am aware I need to increase my zinc to up my immune system but this is proved difficult with a super restrictive diet.

    Has anyone got any tips for me?

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Effect of anti depressants on the gut
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Prescription antidepressants are not a single family of drugs, there are several with different mechanisms of action. Similarly gut health is a huge field. So it would not be possible to study such a broad topic in one or even a small number of scientific studies.

    If you want to find out about studies on a specific prescription drug search PubMed or Google Scholar and/ or speak to your community pharmacist. Known side effects will be listed in the patient information leaflet (in the pharmacy box or online).

    It is worth noting that various chronic mental health problems are linked to poorer physical health, in part because we do not always take care of ourselves. Targeted diet modification and physical activity are proven to be beneficial in mild to moderate depression, as well as in gut health. In some cases people can withdraw their prescription medication: speak to the prescribing doctor if you are interested in the self-care approach.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on I’m a returner needing advice
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Rather late to the party but just in case…. Try to get back into keeping your detailed food and symptom diary. This can really promote awareness and focus.

    It is possible to eat quick and easy meals that are also healthy, with limited kitchen equipment or gadgets. You can make a surprisingly decent one pot ‘stir fry’/ steam fry or quick curry in the microwave. Assembly meals can be no more effort than a ready meal.

    Protein: Fish that is already cooked (canned or chiller), hard-boil organic eggs six at a time *in* your kettle, frozen cooked jumbo prawns, probiotic-rich cheeses and yogurt or kefir.
    Fruit and vegetables: A huge range is available ready prepared fresh or frozen.
    Jar sauces: Some brands of tomato/ vegetable sauce or curry sauces have solid ingredients lists and tasty too. I rate Loyd Grossman and supermarket ‘premium’ own brands.
    Starches: Brown rice thread noodles just need a kettle, frozen wholegrain mixes, ‘instant’ ready-cooked brown rice, wholemeal pitta or other flatbreads in the toaster, canned beans and lentils.

    I am not one to talk 😮 but that number of standard glasses of wine is more likely to be harmful when your diet is low quality, and less likely to be harmful when your diet is nutrient dense. Always eat before not with your drinks: there is scientific evidence that the old ‘line your stomach’ thing does reduce the negative effect on alcohol on the liver and the gut.

    Ditto physical activity really can balance out any negative effects of alcohol by making the organs function more efficiently. It does not have to be full-blown formal ‘exercise’. Do you/ can you walk or cycle to and from work, or to and from the pub or both?

    HTH.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Fatty Liver
    on in Welcome
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    AFAIK the Fast 800 Diet is the updated version of the 5:2 Diet. The Clever Guts Diet is about digestive health and general wellbeing not weight management.

    What type of diet has been recommended by the prescribing doctor or registered dietician? It is important to find an eating plan that fits with the medical advice you have already been given.

    Fatty liver is an inflammatory condition linked to metabolic syndrome. This would suggest eating more oily fish (up to four servings a week), more low sugar fruits and non starchy vegetables (*at least* five servings every day) in the full rainbow of bright and dark colours, whole unprocessed grains and pulses. This Mediterranean style of eating fits with all Dr Mosley’s programmes.

    Have you starting keeping a detailed food and activity diary, with servings weighed and measured? Knowing where your diet is at present is key in moving forwards (or downwards on the scale).

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Mind over Munching
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Plan to change as many other parts of the tea-and-sugary-snack ritual as you can. Use a different mug, have a different hot drink (eg. proper cocoa/ fruit tea/ green tea/ Horlicks/ tea with lemon), walk out of the kitchen whilst the kettle boils or your new drink brews. Do more than just think about it, write your plans for your new relaxation ritual down.

    Sit in a different chair or different spot on the sofa, move your coaster to a different side table, hold your mug in the hand you would normally be eating with, set your new mug down on the side you would normally have a little plate. Learn a simple mindfulness, breathing or meditation technique from YouTube and use this during your new evening relaxation ritual.

    Sounds a little strange but this method is proven to work: UK National Health Service and other ‘behaviour change’ professionals use it with their clients or patients.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Mind over Munching
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    “If I drink tea without eating anything I can often feel sick afterwards, which passes after three or four minutes ….. I can drink fruit juice or squash (I don’t drink these very often) without eating so why not tea? I can’t bear to give up tea, it’s such a big part of my life ….. If I ditched the ‘last thing at night’ cup of tea then I wouldn’t eat the food but having a ‘last thing at night’ cup of tea is part of the relaxing process.”

    I have studied and worked in lifestyle healthcare (smoking cessation, healthy eating, physical activity). Some of your language is very similar to how tobaccosmokers or alcoholics talk about their habit and the associations (very often with de-stressing or winding down). Each cigarette or each cup of tea or each alcoholic drink is a separate bad habit with a separate set of rituals to change. Very often the mental side of addiction is much stronger than the physical side.

    The first stage is changing unhealthy habits or aspects of addiction is recognising and acknowledging them just as you have done here. The next step is planning the change: making it much harder to engage in the unhealthy habit and much easier to engage in a healthier habit. Let the people around you know exactly what you are planning, exactly why (ill health or a scare?) and clearly request their support. Anyone who cares about you will want you to be happy and healthy. If the people around you do not listen the first time, say it clearly again (and again and again).

    If you cannot resist the temptation to have a biscuit/ cake/ chocolate/ butter DO NOT buy them in the supermarket and DO NOT have them in your home. Stock up on healthier alternatives that have a similar natural crunch and similar natural sweetness (eg. sliced apple/ carrot sticks/ flavoured nuts and seeds/ homemade granola/ root vegetable crisps). 

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Mind over Munching
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    “If I drink tea without eating anything I can often feel sick afterwards, which passes after three or four minutes ….. I can drink fruit juice or squash (I don’t drink these very often) without eating so why not tea? I can’t bear to give up tea, it’s such a big part of my life ….. If I ditched the ‘last thing at night’ cup of tea then I wouldn’t eat the food but having a ‘last thing at night’ cup of tea is part of the relaxing process.”

    I have studied and worked in lifestyle healthcare (smoking cessation, healthy eating, physical activity). Some of your language is very similar to how tobaccosmokers or alcoholics talk about their habit and the associations (very often with de-stressing or winding down). Each cigarette or each cup of tea or each alcoholic drink is a separate bad habit with a separate set of rituals to change. Very often the mental side of addiction is much stronger than the physical side.

    The first stage is changing unhealthy habits or aspects of addiction is recognising and acknowledging them just as you have done here. The next step is planning the change: making it much harder to engage in the unhealthy habit and much easier to engage in a healthier habit.

    Let the people around you know exactly what you are planning, exactly why (ill health or a scare?) and clearly request their support. Anyone who cares about you will want you to be happy and healthy. If the people around you do not listen the first time, say it clearly again (and again and again).

    If you cannot resist the temptation to have a biscuit/ cake/ chocolate/ butter DO NOT buy them in the supermarket and DO NOT have them in your home. Stock up on healthier alternatives that have a similar natural crunch and similar natural sweetness (eg. sliced apple/ carrot sticks/ flavoured nuts and seeds/ homemade granola/ root vegetable crisps).

    Plan to change as many other parts of the tea-and-sugary-snack ritual as you can. Use a different mug, have a different hot drink (eg. proper cocoa/ fruit tea/ green tea/ Horlicks/ tea with lemon), walk out of the kitchen whilst the kettle boils or your new drink brews. Do more than just think about it, write your plans for your new relaxation ritual down.

    Sit in a different chair or different spot on the sofa, move your coaster to a different side table, hold your mug in the hand you would normally be eating with, set your new mug down on the side you would normally have a little plate. Learn a simple mindfulness, breathing or meditation technique from YouTube and use this during your new evening relaxation ritual.

    Sounds a little strange but this method is proven to work: UK National Health Service and other ‘behaviour change’ professionals use it with their clients or patients.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Reboot/repair – symptoms worse?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    ‘Detoxing’ is not a recognised medical phenomenon, it comes from the alternative health community. The human body eliminates ‘toxins’ or waste products daily via the liver, kidneys and gut, if it did not we would die. It is more likely that you have increased your intake of dietary prebiotics too much in too short a period of time. The increased bulk of the stool itself and/ the or gassy waste products can cause bloating or otherwise irritate the bowel.

    Dr Mosley recommends to “keep a detailed daily food and symptom diary for at least a week before you start, to help identify any pattern in relation to diet … Ideally keep the diary going throughout the programme until you identify any culprits” (p.187). He further notes that “we don’t recommend removing too many foods at one time, so it might be helpful to do remove and repair in several stages …” (p.188).

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on How eating disorders affect gut health?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Have you discussed your concerns about your gut health with a medical professional?
    Disordered eating is unique to each individual. Restricting food can obviously cause macronutrient and micronutrient insufficiencies or deficiencies. Binging and purging can irritate, inflame or damage the any portion of the digestive tract from mouth to rectum. However this can calm and repair with a consistent nutrient dense wholefood diet. Hence the Clever Guts diet!

    Given that you relapse regularly it may be unwise to seek out a prescriptive personalised eating plan, but rather to consult a registered dietician in person.

    Dr Mosley recommends to “keep a detailed daily food and symptom diary for at least a week before you start, to help identify any pattern in relation to diet … Ideally keep the diary going throughout the programme until you identify any culprits” (p.187). This will be be very valuable to any medical professional that you consult.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Julye on Seaweed?
    on in Prebiotics
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    Hi my son has idiopathis urticaria and is currently taking strong antihistimines would the seaweed capsules help as I think this is an autoimmune condition and he would really not be continually taking antihistimines as he has been taking them for almost a year and a half. He has tried to reduce them but gets symptoms again.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Flaxseed oil
    on in Newbies
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    Flaxseed oil is rich in short chain omega-3s: these are inefficiently converted in the human body to the useable long chain format (DHA and EPA) at rates as low as 10%. Furthermore short chain omega-3s are much less stable than long chain omega-3s so the oil easily oxidises and goes rancid.

    GrahamPhillips is correct that flaxseed oil is more processed than extra virgin olive oil or virgin avocado oil: not least because olives and avocados (both fruits) are soft and easily cold-pressed, whereas flaxseeds have a hard, indigestible coating so need to be finely ground to release the oil.

    The only rich dietary source of long chain omega-3s are oily fish (eg. mackerel/ sardines/ salmon/ trout). Oily fish are also the only rich dietary source of bioavailable vitamin D. UK healthy eating guidelines recommend up to four servings of oily fish each week. There is no minimum requirement for flaxseeds or their oil, it simply is not essential for health.

    There are much smaller amounts of omega-3s (DHA and EPA) and vitamin D3 in organic, free-range eggs from hens fed a seed rich diet. Dr Mosley’s advice on extra virgin olive oil and oily fish are on pages 103 to 110 of the Clever Guts Diet book.

    Please do not use dietary supplements – including oils – without the guidance of a qualified health professional (eg. family doctor, registered dietician) who has access to your medical notes and/ or your detailed food and symptom diary.

  • This has come up before: the meal planners (p.262 – 265) are examples only, they are not prescriptive. We all have different health conditions, different symptoms, different starting diets, different lifestyles and different gut microbiomes. Because of that there is no one-size-fits-all ‘remove and repair’ stage.

    Dr Mosley recommends to “keep a detailed daily food and symptom diary for at least a week before you start, to help identify any pattern in relation to diet … Ideally keep the diary going throughout the programme until you identify any culprits” (p.187). He further notes that “we don’t recommend removing too many foods at one time, so it might be helpful to do remove and repair in several stages …” (p.188).

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Food labelling/guidelines
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    ** So you might …
    Replace white potatoes with other root vegetables (eg. carrot, celeriac)
    Replace baked beans with other pulses (eg. kidney beans, edamame)
    Replace sweetcorn with other yellow veggies (eg. bell pepper, baby corn)
    Replace red or black grapes with other dark fruit (eg. raspberries, blackberries)
    Replace white pasta with other grains (pot barley, wild rice).
    And so on.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Food labelling/guidelines
    on in Newbies
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    Your question is not ‘daft’ at all, but unfortunately it is not as simple as a magic figure.

    The amount of carbohydrate in a food item depends on the concentration and on the portion size. The effect on your blood glucose depends on how that food is processed, how it is cooked or prepared, what other foods it is eaten with and other factors. Nutrition tables and ingredients lists are best used to compare one food to another in the same group, and thus make healthy swaps.**

    Are you testing and recording your blood glucose regularly? Have you been completing and analysing your detailed food and symptom diary (p.187)? What have you been advised to eat or to avoid eating by health professionals (diagnosing doctor/ diabetic nurse/ registered dietician/ NHS leaflet)?

    The purpose of removing foods in several stages (p.190) and reintroducing them slowly (p.194) is to identify those that are problematic for you. The detailed food and symptom diary “will help you be systematic and focussed in your approach” (p. 188). Given how well you have done so far, you might now use your diary to monitor the effect of individual foods, or of healthy swaps **, or compare different methods of preparation (eg. raw/ lightly steamed/ blended/ long slow cooked).

    Be aware that some groups of moderate carb or higher carb foods (eg. wholegrains/ beans/ lentils) are rich in minerals, soluble and insoluble fibre. It is very easy for a lower carbohydrate diet to become restrictive, imbalanced or low in certain nutrients. Your detailed food diary helps you and health professionals check whether your new diet is properly balanced and varied.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Treats
    on in Newbies
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    During the Remove and Repair phase Dr Mosley recommends we “avoid snacking between meals …” (p.262) and we “keep [sweetened foods] to a minimum during and after the programme” (p.188).

    Changing our diet long term includes changing our mindset. The Clever Guts Diet is not about ‘depriving’ ourselves so ideally we would not ‘treat’ or reward ourselves with food either. The chocolate-aubergine brownies are neither ‘healthy’ nor unhealthy. They include ingredients that some of us need to avoid (eggs, sugary dates).

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Help antibiotics
    on in Probiotics
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    Supermum & Gita: sorry to read of your recent health problems. I hope you are both ‘on the mend’ by the time you read this.

    It is always worthwhile eating a properly balanced and very varied wholefood diet, including probiotic-rich foods (unless you have been medically advised to avoid these). A healthy, anti inflammatory diet supports the body as it recovers from the physical stress of an infection or other illness.

    Any given prescription antibiotic is effective against some groups or types of bacteria, not against all bacteria nor are they effective against other potentially harmful or potentially beneficial microbes (fungi/ moulds/ yeasts). Different probiotic-rich foods contain different bacteria/ fungi/ moulds/ yeasts, hence experts advocate consuming a wide variety of such foods.

    Any supplements should be discussed with an appropriately qualified health professional (prescribing doctor/ pharmacist/ registered dietician) who has access to your medical history.

    HTH!

  • Acne vulgaris is not a straightforward skin infection, it is an inflammatory condition. Diet absolutely can contribute to the health of the skin barrier, but the overall lifestyle and skincare routine is relevant. What many in the West consider ‘normal’ personal hygeine and haircare can easily irritate, inflame or damage the skin barrier and disrupt the skin’s own microbiome.

    Antimicrobial activity is linked to concentration and dose, be that in a compound found in the essential oil of an edible plant or a prescription medication. No antibiotic is active against all bacteria but rather are active against certain groups, so qualified medical professionals select different antibiotics for different infections. Interestingly at low doses some prescription ‘antibiotic’ drugs appear to be effective for certain skin conditions (eg. papulopustular rosacea) due to their anti-inflammatory properties only. Conversely essential oils tend to be rich in known allergens, known irritants and known toxins, so the risks can easily outweigh any reputed beneficial properties.

    Research suggests that the components of fruits and vegetables – including culinary herbs – that have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory health benefits when eaten in sufficient quantity are primarily the bright and dark pigmented compounds (polyphenols/ carotenes) not the volatile components of the essential oil.

    HTH.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Not been active here in quite a while … ironically I am now a Which? subscriber.
    Unfortunately their article on EVOO has been pulled. Best I can come up with is that M&S Toscano was the Which? Best Buy scoring 81%.

    Ste92: Anyone can post anything online; copy and paste is rife in lazy blogland. Check your sources carefully, check the precise wording carefully, check the country or region carefully.

    No legitimate research scientist will use the word “mobsters” nor blame “the mafia” without evidence. Read the actual study or the official press release, or a high quality news article NEVER EVER a fifth hand drama blog post written by real live muppets.

    Italy =/= the European Union. Engine oil =/= extra virgin olive oil.

  • A little update for anyone else trying this.. After 4 days of eating seaweed my skin has cleared up (following being infammed / dry / cracked for 4 weeks now). I’m not sure if this is concidence or as a direct result of the seaweed. I’ll keep updating this (for my own benefit too!).

  • I’ve just started Clever Guts to try and help with Perioral dermatitis on my face. An outbreak can last for months and I read (somewhere) that gut bacteria can help with this. After reading the book I started the diet, not really doing the meal plans but cutting out all the recommended things for Phase 1: bread, gluten, processed sugar, alcohol (not that I’m a drinker anyway) and grains; whilst increasing variety of fruit and veg and adding in fermented foods. After a week I feel an enormous difference, even though my goal wasn’t to lose weight, I lost 4lbs and continue to feel a lot lighter and less bloated. I am more regular and following a bumpy first week of sleep, have started to get more restful shuteye. However, my skin, whilst not always inflammed, is still very dry and cracked on and around my lips. So 3 days ago, following the seaweed thread, I decided to introduce 4g of dried (then rehydrated) Wakame. If anyone else has tried this or other things to help with the skin it would be great to know how you’ve got on.

  • I started fasting from after meal time at night till 12 md.I find that works and has fixed my IBS and a side effect I never expected is that it seems to have given me appetite control.I was always hungry even shortly after meals but that isn’t happening now.It’s the first time in many years I have been able to go out in the morning and have no worries.

  • posted by  Rhonda W on Resistant Starch
    on in Welcome
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    Happy to help. I LOVE this topic and want everybody to understand its importance. Resistant starch does not change one thing in metabolism – it changes everything! There is nothing else that I have seen with the quantity and quality of scientific studies showing improved metabolism and gut health. I urge you to keep learning about it and using it in whatever form you prefer.

  • posted by  Ger45 on Olive Oil Quality
    on in Welcome
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    Can anyone advise me whether any of the main supermarkets sell good quality Olive oil and extra virgin oil?

  • posted by  Rhonda W on Resistant Starch
    on in Welcome
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    One study reported that cooked and cooled corn polenta had 0.8 grams of resistant starch per 100 grams of polenta, which isn’t a lot. Reheating would increase it, but the quantity would still be low.

  • posted by  supermum on Bone Broth
    on in Newbies
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    I make bone broth every week and have a my own technique now. whilst still warm i ladle it into pots through a (not too fine) sieve. As it cools it will develop a thin layer of fat on the top. i use this when i cook because i imagine it is full of goodness but you could just as easily scrape off. after getting all the liquid out of the stock i remove the bones and give the chicken and carrots to the dogs. i like to always have a few pots of stock in the freezer.

  • posted by  supermum on Resistant Starch
    on in Welcome
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    how resistant is the starch in polenta? again is it better if it is cooked, cooled and then reheated?

  • posted by  Marinecole on Seaweed
    on in Welcome
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    Hi
    Been here a while, I’m confused.
    Nori sheets, are they the same ones to wrap sushi? I want to make the seaweed chip recipe, but not sure what to order.
    Thanks anyone
    MC

  • posted by  andyleeds on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    I read the link you sent me. I personally would not trust the person, I wouldn’t, she is not saying anything new and all the brands she lists on the articles, the ones not approved, are all supermarket ones, at least for the Italian producers which I am familiar with and are very cheap oils. I always say how can you expect to pay for a litre of oil 3£ and then spend 25£ for the engine oil? it doesn’t look like she has tasted the oil but it looks like she is copying the label.
    A couple of good points are the dark bottle, protect from light, and the price. It is also true that olive oil get frozen when cold, and it is a good sign, however, she says don’t buy light or blends and this is incorrect. Light olive oil in which sense? olive oil from cooler countries or area tend to be lighter, more delicate, so what does she mean? Blend, plenty of great olive oils are blend, blend of olives not oils, the article is not clear and only confusion. Yes it is true that there could be fraud but always think about the amount you are paying for it. 3/4/5 or even 6£ for a litre of olive oil, we cant expect anything great.

  • posted by  ste92 on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Cheers. I will try look for some links properly after work but if you type in anything like…
    olive oil fraud, scam, fake olive oils, mobsters, mafia… etc anything with a combination of these should bring up some of the more well known articles I would think.

    I have one quick link here but I think it’s referring more to ones that are not officially extra virgin ( maybe that’s what I am actually thinking of?) either way it’s worth reading just because it lists some pretty well known brands as not passing the tests, it lists ‘good’ ones too but they aren’t available in the UK where I am unfortunately.
    https://www.realfoodforlife.com/which-olive-oil-to-buy-the-olive-oil-fraud/

  • posted by  ste92 on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Understood thanks, I will try out some of the oils from the website you suggested!
    Definitely take a look online about what I mentioned though as there is an awful lot about it online, my summary might have been off ofcourse. but take a look and let me know your thoughts when you get chance .

  • posted by  andyleeds on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Stef92,
    you have definitely got this wrong.. this would be a fraud and it could happen anywhere. Australian and Californian or even Spanish and Greek not only have different varieties of olives and therefore oils, but they are bigger producers and therefore tend to be cheaper, however, there are some brands which are very expensive.

    The quality of the oil depends on: quality of the olive and variety, not all varieties can produce good oil, ripeness of the olives, conditions of the olives when they reach the mill, they should not be damaged, and pressed asap from the harvesting. The other difference is made by the mill, there are plenty of mills around but new technology allow producers to enter the olives and get the oil, benefits are that the oil stay protected from the oxygen, oxidation problems wont happen, and nitrogen is used for its conservation instead of oxygen again to protect the quality. Dark bottle is a must.

  • posted by  ste92 on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Hi Andy, it might just be that I have been misunderstanding what I have read online.
    I was under the impression that most EVO is run by mobsters to some degree especially in Italy and that about 80% of the oils they have done studies on ( theres a lot on the internet about it ) didn’t actually pass the miniminal standards / requirements to even be classed as olive oil due to them mixing and even replacing them with other unhealthy cheap oils. I thought this was the reason people were recommending australian and californian brands?
    There is a good chance i have got this wrong lol!
    Thanks in avdance

  • posted by  andyleeds on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Hi Ste92
    I did not really understand your question. the oils on Italyabroad.com are all fantastic oils, and are all extra virgin olive oils from Italian olives, but there are thousands of other fantastic olive oils made in Italy, so in Spain or Greece, just read our guide and you will be able to see for yourself the difference between a bad and a good oil. You cant replace olive oil with other oils and you cant write extra virgin if it is not, this is fraud, what you can do and many supermarkets oils are is oils that have the “made in Italy” text big on the label, but have on the back in small characters “made from EU oils”.

    Hope I answered your question.

  • posted by  ste92 on Olive oil taste test
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Hi Andy, are you meaning that the olive oils sold on this website are pure / best quality without being replaced with other oils? or am I misunderstanding
    Thanks

  • posted by  ste92 on basil ( and other herbs ) effect on probiotics in the gut?
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi everyone.
    I have been trying to clear up my back acne by eating incredibly well and including home made pro biotics such as kefir daily.
    I consider my diet to be very healthy, but I like to use a lot of herbs and spices too, which again, I considered to be healthy. I have always thought eating lots of basil and other herbs that have similar effects would be great for my acne due to it being anti bacterial.
    However, it only just occured to me that this would pretty much go against the benefits of probiotics too as it would destroy the good bacteria as well ( I am guessing? )

    I’m not saying they should be avoided of course, but if I am after the anti bacterial type properties from the basil, is it a waste / not going to make any positive effect whilst also taking probiotics?
    I just wondered peoples thoughts on this?
    Thanks in advance

  • posted by  Colb on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
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    Hi Lyndal 🙂
    I am not a great fan of the medical profession, I might sound a bit sceptical about them, but it is more the pharmaceutical companies running the show, if they can give use a pill for this or that they certainly won’t be happy if we change our eating habits to reverse disease that can ultimately kill us.
    We put our health in our GP’s hands, and the good ones will suggest diet reversal I believe there is some GP’s who actually get their patients to go on some of Dr Mosley;s eating plans, that is a GP who is looking out for their patient. best to give that a go in the first instance.
    Being a Skinny Minnie will I imagine have just as many problems as trying to loose weight, I am just a carb person big time !!, and very pleased I don’t have a sweet tooth, I just saw a guy at the local diary a few minutes ago who was extremely obese buying a large bottle of coke, and I thought if he goes to his Dr, maybe the Dr isn’t saying hey you are going to kill yourself.
    Huge topic!!
    I look forward to hearing how you get on with your tests.
    Will let you know how I get on getting a test done.
    Appreciate your help.
    Cheers
    Col

  • posted by  Buhler on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
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    Yes I agree Col, it’s a shame we can’t get tested here. One day hopefully it will be mainstream, just like getting a blood test, as like you said, gut health plays such a big part in how we are feeling and our overall health.
    I hear you about bread. I LOVE bread, in fact any carbs I love. But I do feel better when I limit them. And sugar is just pure poison for me. Such a shame because I love sugar even more than bread 😆
    My problem is keeping the weight on as I’m a bit of a skinny Minnie to start with. So when I cut out carbs I loose to much weight.
    It’s going to be so interesting to see what my test comes back with.

  • posted by  Colb on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
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    Hi Lyndal,
    Again thank you !!
    I will give him a ring tomorrow, plus contact Bioscreen, $ 1000 isn’t that bad as like you said you then know what is going on.
    I too try and cut as much gluten out of my diet, its terrible at the best of times, I dramatically cut bread out of my diet at the start of the year, mainly because its far to easy to eat instead of thinking of a healthier alternative, and certainly doesn’t help with weight!!, but I so love it !!
    I only started clever guts a few weeks ago, and started shedding weight, I am not over weight by any means, but that spare tyre needed to come off, and my blood tests weren’t flash, and have no intention of getting to the stage of needing medication, so action it is !!
    When I mentioned it to my GP she was in agreement.
    Really we can just about reverse most things thank goodness.
    Thank goodness we have come far with the research that is being done, fascinating reading.
    But feel this testing needs to be done in NZ as well since its such a big issue for a lot of people.
    Cheers.
    Col.

  • posted by  Buhler on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
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    Hi Col,

    You will need to find someone who has the forms from Bioscreen that are needed. You might want to contact Bioscreen ( google them) and ask them if the could recommend someone in Christchurch. Failing that you could ring Dr Caunes at the Holistic Medical Centre and he might do a phone consultation and send you down the forms you need.
    It cost around NZ$500 to get the test done and then all the Dr’s fees on top of that. So probably around $1000 by the time you add up all the costs. But I think it’s worth it to see exactly what’s going on in your gut. It takes all the guess work out.
    It takes about 5 or 6 weeks to get the results back.
    I sort of follow the Clever Guts diet. And I definitely feel better if I stick to it. And cutting out gluten has helped., even though I didn’t think I had a problem with it, it has definitely made an improvement since cutting it out. And it’s easy to go gluten free, there is so many alternative available now. Their cook book is great and lots of yummy, easy recipes which will help you stick to the diet.
    I would hold off taking any supplements until you have the test done and got the results back.

    Hope this helps a bit
    Lyndal

  • posted by  Colb on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
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    Hi again,
    A medical herbalist is a holistic health practitioner? I have seen one here in Christchurch, but probably need to ask her if she does referrals.
    Just gets a bit confusing.
    Many thanks.
    Cheers,
    Col.