Latest forum posts

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Anti viral & antibiotics & probiotics
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    There seem to be few probiotic supplements that are backed by any research at all. Worse, tests by consumer organisations/ the media have found that some brands do not have anything like the strength (measured by CFUs) on the label. How the product is transported and stored after manufacture is relevant.

    One of the regulars here (GrahamSPhillips) is a pharmacist and has listed a few brands of probiotics – including VSL3 and Symprove – that have been studied in specific populations.

    Clever Guts emphasises eating a really wide a variety of live fermented, probiotic rich foods for a really wide variety of species of gut friendly bacteria and yeasts. It is encouraging that, after having their guts flushed out for science, both Dr Michael Mosley and Prof Tim Spector turned to whole and fermented foods, not supplements.

    I have needed 5 or 6 courses of antibiotics in a year, which has decimated my gut microbiome! I eat a range of traditional aged European cheeses (unpasteurised milk/ blue veined/ mould ripened/ rind washed) PLUS Nexabiotic brand capsules (claims 23 strains, 34.5 billion CFUs).

    The worst gut symptoms after a course of antibiotics was when I fed the surviving microbes a massive dose of sugar, the best when they got oily fish, vegetables, berries, seeds and so on.

    Is your gastroenterologist or registered dietician supporting you with Clever Guts, ideally by going through your food and symptom diary regularly? My concern would be how balanced and varied your diet is, given the restrictions of coeliac disease + time pressures + Clever Guts + personal/ family tastes.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Help please
    on in Intermittent fasting
    permalink

    Detoxing as you are describing is a concept not supported by the medical professionals, including Dr Mosley AFAIK. Our bodies ‘detox’ or eliminate on a daily basis: via the kidneys and bladder, liver and bowel, to a lesser extent the skin.

    Sugar gets burned as energy or converted to body fat and stordeed, it doesn’t become some other toxic substance. Metabolites of alcohol can certainly contribute to a hangover, but not weeks or months later.

    If you have liver damage from chronic alcohol abuse or high fat/ sugar diet and obesity, please consult the diagnosing doctor or a registered dietician before trying Clever Guts.

    If you are following Clever Guts or Dr Mosley’s 5:2 properly, you are likely eating a far better balance of minerals/ electrolytes than on your previous poor diet. Minerals/ electrolytes are found in fish, other seafood, vegetables, seaweeds, seeds, nuts, beans, lentils ….

    Potentially dangerous electrolyte imbalances absolutely can occur when crash dieting, when very dehydrated or with diarrhoea. Many ‘cleanses’ or ‘detoxes’ are this type of diet.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Help… my mother is having real problems with stomach
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Please do not have colonic irrigation. There is a risk of perforating the bowel, which is increased in older people due to tissues thinning and weakening. Given the history of prolapse, I would have hoped the practitioner would have referred straight back to her doctor.

    You don’t say which laxatives have been used past or present. Some are suitable for regular long term use, many can worsen the situation if overused. Has the doctor or pharmacist raised and discounted the possibility of overflow diarrhoea? This is liquid faeces escaping around/ past a hard stool in the bowel (ie. constipation).

    Daily physical activity (walking/ swimming/ gardening/ aqua aerobics/ chair-based exercise) stimulates bowel movement. Please check first with the family doctor or an exercise professional *qualified in working with older adults*

    In diet modification the starting point is the detailed food and symptom diary (p.187). Use this to check the balance and variety of the current diet, and to track as your mother increases prebiotic and probiotic rich foods. This diary will be invaluable if you consult a registered dietician.

    Diarrhoea can cause mineral imbalances – especially magnesium – which can contribute to many health problems including anxiety. Foods rich in nutrients beneficial in mental wellbeing and a healthy gut include oily fish, certain seeds, cocoa/ low sugar dark chocolate.

    As per the Clever Guts book, minimise sugary fruits. Eat a really wide variety of non starchy vegetables, bright and dark coloured berries, half an apple or pear with the skin, seeds, nuts, beans, lentils.

  • posted by  J-J on Help please
    on in Intermittent fasting
    permalink

    Thanks for taking time to respond. Headaches while detoxing are quite usual which I knew but I was just wondering what others on this site did when they experienced them, in case they had some good advice.
    I resorted to Epsom salts baths, peppermint essential oil baths, drinking apple cider vinegar in water and hot or cold packs at the back of my neck. These were all remedies I found online at the weekend and they have helped.
    Today I cooked spiced cashews as I heard that lack of electrolytes can also cause the headaches which is due to my body releasing toxins previously stored in fat cells. The toxins came from sugar, alcohol, processed food, etc. I know it’s due to my poor diet in the past and hopefully I will never repeat that.
    Thanks again.

  • posted by  GezzaG on Portion size
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    When a recipe calls for 140g of green-pea pasta or 2 tbsp of brown rice, is this before cooking or after. Obviously, 2 tbsp of uncooked rice will double in size. So which is it?

  • posted by  Debra L on Anti viral & antibiotics & probiotics
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    I have a question on what is the best probiotic to take in addition to diet.The situation is that I am just on my 3rd round of antivirals for shingles as i have had the rash 3 times in 6 weeks. The doctor has also prescibed me antibiotics as she thinks that the rash off the dermalines is folliculitis but that the shingles has returned (or maybe not gone away). I have been following the clever guts diet since beginning of Jan to kick start and reboot my microbiome as I am also a coeliac and have pernicious aneamia for which i have B12 injections – the last one was 3 weeks ago. I have been havng accupuncture for 5 weeks also and the accupunturist and the doctor have said that my immune system is very low and this has probably been going on a long time. I have a stressful job, i travel and spend 4 hr a day travelling to an from work. I want my body to heal as naturally as possible and i do not want to undo all the good i have been doing with the clever guts diet so any advise on probiotic help will be gratefully received.
    Many thanks

  • posted by  Donk on Help… my mother is having real problems with stomach
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi, my mother is 82 had been very healthy until last March she had a partial vaginal prolapse, she saw a gynaecologist who said stop pushing during bowl movement or it could get worse.. he meant stop straining so unfortunately my mother took him literally. Mums had trouble with constipation for last few years, we think due to general anaesthetic so she started taking laxatives. 12 months later thing are real mess she is lurching from not going for a few days to having diarrhoea and is now constantly in pain her bowls or gut area. And we don’t know what to do now.. we’ve tried GI Natural probiotics (and many others), Solgar advanced Acidophilus plus, Solgar Comfort Zone along with Kefir yogurt.

    Her diet is and always has been very good lots of fruit and fibre and no white stuff..

    Trying colonic irrigation this week.

    Any advise or recommendation for who to go and see. Were not sure what type of doctor to go see. WE saw colorectal who checked a CT scan/ virtual colonoscopy and said all fine. And he advised on low does laxatives which we are doing but still no improvement.

    Please help if you can..

    PS. She is now on sertraline as her problem and constant pain have caused her to become anxious.

    Toby

  • posted by  delmareproulx on Stress
    on in Stress, sleep and mindfulness
    permalink

    Hi there, according to me, you are in depression and unable to take decision properly that what you want to do. I think you can also try diet guide which helps to eat you healthy and regular workout which helps to make you overcome from stress. There is also an expert who provides you guidance to take you out from stress. They can see the things going in your life and guide you as per the situation to move in life. I have heard good reviews about http://www.martine-voyance.com online who can provide you the best way to move positively in life.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on SIBO problems
    on in Intermittent fasting
    permalink

    What medical treatment or dietary changes has the diagnosing doctor recommended?

    AFAIK the only proven medical treatments to substantially reduce the bacteria in the small intestine are prescription antibiotics or prescribed meal replacements (rests the gut and starves the microbes). Both treatments need medical supervision and both will also impact the bacteria in the large intestine.

    After the course of treatment is complete you may well be able to work within the guidelines of Clever Guts in order to continue to allow your gut lining to recover, and encourage a normal/ healthy microbiome to flourish. Clever Guts is fundamentally a properly balanced, very varied, anti inflammatory wholefood diet.

    If at all possible do this with support from the diagnosing doctor, a gastroenterologist or registered dietician (p.187). This is even more importamt if you have other medical conditions linked to the SIBO.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Help please
    on in Intermittent fasting
    permalink

    Please consult your pharmacist. We can’t know the cause of the headache and nausea, and we don’t have access to your medical history. In any case most of us here have no healthcare qualifications whatsoever.

    If you have been completing the detailed food and symptom diary (p.187), and working slowly in stages (p.190) you may be able to identify the cause *if it is related to diet or lifestyle changes*.

    Obvious ones would be caffeine withdrawal or blood sugar dropping. Introducing fasting is a big change for some, you may need to do this in a separate stage to the dietary changes.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Fruit?
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Define fruit! 😉

    What we think of as ‘fruit’ is the produce that has been intensively selected for millenia to be larger, juicier and much higher in sugar.

    Sugary produce that is often eaten by westerners with ‘Remove & Repair’ no-nos (cows dairy/ refined sugar/ sweetener/ processed grains).

    Sugary produce that we often have a double or triple serving of: the UK recommended 80g is only half a banana, half an apple, or a sixth of a punnet of grapes!

    Clever Guts actually includes quite a bit of lower sugar fruits, those that are commonly eaten in savoury dishes. For example tomatoes, bell pepper, olives, avocado, aubergine, butternut squash, courgettte, cucumber, lemons. And a small amount of obvious fruits, specifically berries, pear, apple.

    So I think it is a combination of reasons: reducing sugars, eliminating sweeteners, increasing savoury dishes, increasing prebiotic rich produce, increasing antioxidants, learning portion control.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on I don’t like salad!
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    What storage and cooking facilities do you have at home and work? Freezer, slow cooker/ crock pot, regular or combi microwave, plug in sandwich toaster/ griddle/ panini press?

    Try to maintain a really wide variety in your meals/ combinations of foods; not sugary fruit nor the same lower nutrient protein (chicken) every day.

    Eggs are ideal for breakfasts or lunches: portioned by nature, don’t need refrigerating, work well with minimally cooked vegetables. Eggs can be cooked in a microwave container, in a ziplock freezer bag in boiled water from the kettle, or there are specialised cooking gadgets (omelette/ poached/ boiled).

    Similarly fish fillets – rainbow trout, sea bass, salmon – can be steamed quickly and easily in a microwave container, or poached using the same ziplock/ kettle method as eggs. Canned oily fish – mackerel, sardines, pilchards – can be eaten at room temperature or warmed through/ grilled.

    BTW oily fish is our only dietary source of vitamin D (sunlight is too weak October to March here in the UK) and anti inflammatory long chain omega-3s. Fish and other seafood encourages different gut microbes than land animal meats.

    Vegetable-based curries and casseroles reheat well for lunches, or there are the trendy Kilner jar noodle/ rice/ vegetable pots for which you just need a kettle.

    What don’t you like about salads other than them being chilled? There are an infinite number of ingredients and dressings. They don’t have to ever include a pile of leaves!

    Canned beans or lentils, nuts or larger seeds, root vegetables all make salads heartier/ less wintery and do much better out of the refrigerator than delicate lettuce, tomato, avocado and cucumber.

    For speed (including faster clearing up!) I prefer potato peeler ribbons or mandoline slices to grated salad vegetables. You must cook regular potatoes but beetroot, smaller parsnips, sweet potatoes, carrots and smaller celeriac can be eaten raw. I also like romanesco cauliflower, tenderstem broccoli, fine asparagus and banana shallots in winter salads.

  • posted by  siancybi on What to eat sauerkraut with?
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hi, how did this new batch of sauerkraut made with the mix of vegetables & apple turn out? I too tend to feel it’s like eating medicine & not finding it enjoyable. I’m rather afraid to try mixing things up, I’m not sure if it would ferment properly.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Rebooting
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    An alternative to ‘Remove & Repair’ is to make healthier or gut friendlier swaps one-by-one in order to *slowly and steadily* increase the probiotic, prebiotic and other nutrient content of your diet.

    So instead of cows milk or processed cheese you might have live goats milk yoghurt, homemade kefir, Roquefort blue cheese, barrel-aged Greek feta and Camembert de Normandie.

    Instead of white potatoes you might have a selection of coloured root vegetables (rainbow
    carrots, beetroot, purple yam, turnip, sweet potato).

    Instead of branded breakfast cereal, you might have a ‘granola’ of seeds, coconut chips and cocoa nibs. On another morning a vegetable omelette or frittata, and another morning mixed grain muesli with frozen berries.

    By swapping you are not overwhelming yourself with new foods and new recipes, sticking to the spirit of Clever Guts (working in stages, p. 190 + 193), can track with your food diary, allow your gut microbiome time to acclimatise.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Rebooting
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    For healthy/ ‘normal’ gut transit (occurring in part due to a healthy/ ‘normal’ gut flora) we need a *properly balanced and very varied* wholefood diet.

    Vegetables are not more important nor more effective than other prebiotic rich food group in bulking the stool. We need a balance and wide variety of certain fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts, beans, lentils, wholegrains.

    If you move quickly from a low fibre diet to a moderate or high fibre diet, you are likely to experience unpleasant gut symptoms such as excessive gas, bloating and even pain, so might appear to be intolerant to many nutrient dense wholefoods!

    The key aspect of overhauling the diet is the detailed food and symptom diary. This will show you which food groups and types you are overeating and which you are undereating. This is measured by portion size and portion number for each group or type.

    If you feel confident you are not intolerant or allergic to cows dairy products or grains containing gluten AND have not been overemphasising them, you may not need to exclude or avoid them entirely.

  • posted by  jade66 on SIBO problems
    on in Intermittent fasting
    permalink

    Hi, can anyone advise. I have been diagnosed with SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) which is giving me severe bloating problems. I have not seen any mention of this in the Clever Guts book although apparently it is a very common gastro problem which I thought might have been addressed. I would like to know if the Remove and Repair section of the reboot would help resolve the SIBO issues. Any ideas gratefully received. I would have emailed Michael directly for an answer but didn’t see anywhere where I could do this.
    Thanks.

  • posted by  J-J on Headaches
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I’m on day four of rebooting my biome. I have had a terrible headache since yesterday. Any advice please. I also feel a bit nauseous today. It’s like a migraine. I’ve held off taking paracetamol but don’t think I can take much more.

  • posted by  Stevoka on Fruit?
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    There seems to be very little fruit in the Clever Guts diet. I was a bit surprised as I imagined it would be very good for the biome. Is it mainly to avoid the excess sugars or are there other reasons to avoid fruit?

  • posted by  J-J on Help please
    on in Intermittent fasting
    permalink

    I am on day four of rebooting my biome. I am suffering from awful headaches and this morning nausea too. We are eating lots of good food. Is there anything I can take to help please? I’ve avoided paracetamol but do t know if I can hold out much longer.

  • posted by  Stevoka on I don’t like salad!
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    I’m out of the remove and repair phase and trying to find a regular set up that isn’t hugely time consuming. I thought the phyto lunchbox would be good for work each day, but I’ve remembered that I really don’t enjoy salad. It’s also cold so I would prefer something warm. I was thinking of having a fruit salad in the morning to try to get my phyto hit then making the happy guts soup for lunch. Any thoughts?

  • posted by  Stevoka on Recipes
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    A place for discussion about the foods you’ve been eating as part of Cleverguts. This could include simplifications, things that are super yummy and links you have made across programmes

  • posted by  Rowan on A note from Michael on the book
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Dear Michael

    I’m part way through the book and am very interested in the potato starch survey.

    I have not yet done any research myself on this, but interested as I have some issues with sleep. I use melatonin daily.

    We do intermittent fasting, eat healthy, use turmeric and supplements. I would be happy to provide you with more health and lifestyle details if required.

    Thanks for the books and videos which are extremely informative and helpful and quite fun to read.

  • posted by  Lesley62 on Rebooting
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi, all,
    I am very new, my first sign-on and topic. I was going to start the re-booting…..my problem is chronic comstipation. Does this need a remove and repair stage, or just eat heaps more veges? My diet is pretty inconsistent and poor in fresh stuff.

  • Porridge may seem a bit boring having it every morning but have you tried ‘overnight’ oats, or some call them bircher oats (I think they’re called bircher oats if you don’t use milk as the main wet ingredient, and instead use say apple juice or any other kind of juice). I prefer making mine with Kefir that way I get both my probiotic and all the goodness from the oats. I soak the oats (a small cup will make enough for two people) in a bowl with the kefir (either kefir on its own or a mixture of kefir and milk, or sometimes I just use a live yoghurt). You can then add whatever you want to this – I add sliced almonds, blueberries, strawberries when they’re in season, bananas etc etc. I also add a spoonful of Linwoods flaxseed mix, and a spoonful (tsp) of organic cocoa which gives it a lovely nutty, chocolatey flavour – again you can experiment with your favourite fruits (sometimes I add a bit of maple syrup if I’m exercising that morning). I have recently started adding grated apple and some apple juice just for a change of flavour. You just place everything in a bowl and mix well, then put in fridge overnight covered with foil (you can buy bircher jars from Amazon but they’re really not necessary – a deep bowl with some foil does the job just as well). This is a great start to any morning and especially if you have a long walk/cycle to participate in or just life in general.

  • posted by  Shuggieg on Turmeric in Sauerkraut
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Thanks Firefox, I have a well balanced diet using Michael Mosley’s Blood Sugar Diet. I lost 3 stone in 3months and reversed my prediabetic condition. My question about the kraut recipe is whether the turmeric can be absorbed by the body in absence of oil. I take my daily turmeric in the form of preprepared golden paste but thought the kraut would be an additional way of taking it.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Turmeric in Sauerkraut
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Shuggieg: Various nutrients and antioxidants are absorbed or utilised best in the presence of other nutrients. Iron and vitamin C, lycopene and beta carotene with fat, calcium magnesium and vitamin D for example.

    If (for the most part) you eat a properly balanced and varied wholefood diet, and properly balanced and varied meals, you should benefit from each nutrient and antioxidant.

    Regular meals without fat would be pretty miserable affairs. The fat can be from oily fish, whole eggs, traditional cheeses, seeds, nuts, dark chocolate, avocado, olives, coconut, salad dressing, curry sauce … Hopefully you have at least one of these with each meal?

  • posted by  Shuggieg on Turmeric in Sauerkraut
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    I also take turmeric daily in the form of golden paste. As stated in the article the body can’t absorb turmeric directly which is why you need to ‘smuggle’ it in with oil and black pepper. But the sauerkraut recipe only includes black pepper so just wondered if that is sufficient to absorb the turmeric.

  • Start with your detailed food and symptom diary (p.187). Probiotics are only one aspect of Clever Guts: consider the balance and variety of your diet, the nutrient density and prebiotic content, your lifestyle as a whole.

    Prescription medications are scientifically proven safe and effective, when used appropriately. For some medical conditions diet and lifestyle modification can be equally effective, and safer or side effect free to boot. Unfortunately very few patients are willing to overhaul their diet and lifestyle.

    Don’t try to ‘marry up’ what medical professionals advise with what alternative practitioners claim (too often not rooted in any science). Instead be clear with your doctor or pharmacist that you are open to evidence-based diet or lifestyle changes. if they aren’t able to advise they should be able to refer you to another healthcare professional who can.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Gastritis symptoms keep returning
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Have you consulted your family doctor about the gastritis? If yes have they prescribed anything? Will your family doctor refer you to a dietician or gastroenterologist?

    Check the suitability of/ potential side effects of any non-prescription drugs with your pharmacist.

    Your best tool is the detailed food and symptom diary – p.187 – every mouthful as you eat or drink them. Ideally include other potentially relevant factors such as physical acrivity levels, sleep patterns, mood inc. stress levels, weight or body fat percentage and so on.

    Use your diary to identify potential triggers or intolerances, track the balance and variety of your diet. It can also be helpful to your family doctor, dietician or gastroenterologist.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Moochiemum on Gastritis symptoms keep returning
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hello, I’m new on here. I bought The Clever Guts diet book with a view to improving my gut health.
    I’ve suffered from gastritis on and off over the last couple of years. I’ve tried to keep it at bay, changing diet etc avoiding alcohol and caffeine (not easy!)
    I’ve read Michael’s book and it’s really helpful. However, I can feel a flare up coming on (I’ve got a cold and I don’t know if taking medication for that has upset things?!)
    Any help or experience is appreciated.
    Thanks!

  • I have had a nail fungus on my thumbnail and two toenails for years. After taking dangerous prescription medication and countless nail applications, nothing worked.

    A naturopath said it could be something related to my gut and to avoid sugar. Is this related to low levels of Lactobacillus as referred to on pages 58-59 in the book?

    I was on antibiotics for three weeks some years ago related to cellulitis, and this may have caused it.

    Apart from more probiotics, any advice?

    With many thanks, Christel

  • posted by  Rowan on Turmeric in Sauerkraut
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hi I have fresh turmeric daily, I usually add it into my yoghurt or sprinkle on fried vegetables & eggs as it is oil soluble. I will have to try the turmeric sauerkraut recipe. Just trying my first batch of sauerkraut.

  • posted by  Rowan on Cooking Pasta/Rice, cooling and reheating
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi I am new. I am part way through the book and am hooked. It validates many things I have done and tried on myself and family.

    I had seen other posts about the benefits of reheating pasta and other starches. However I have some questions on what re-heating does the nutrients in the foods? Also what are the best methods? Does anyone have any data on this?

  • There are a good number of recipes ‘To start the day’ in the original Clever Guts Diet book – pages 197 to 211 – and presumably more in the CG recipe book.

    The authors recommend eating a *really wide variety* of wholefoods each week, and thus different breakfasts each day.

    Ingredients suitable for breakfasts include lower sugar fruits, certain vegetables, free range or organic eggs, seeds, nuts, live fermented dairy products, coconut or nut based dairy alternatives.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on How much apple cider vinegar to take and how?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    As with many prebiotic or probiotic foods, start with a small ‘dose’ of apple cider vinegar and work up very slowly. There is information using ACV for IBS and other health issues in the ‘Clever Guts Diet’ book (pages 46-47 + 143-146).

    Experiment to find out whether before (diluted in water) or with a meal (as an ingredient) works best for you. Track the results in your detailed food and symptom diary (p.187).

    There are various recipes using ACV in the CG Diet book, and presumably more in the CG recipe book.

  • posted by  Danpalm87 on Biome testing
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    I’ve been looking into this myself and it appears there’s a company in the UK called Atlas Biome who will do an analysis of your microbiome. Might be worth having a look, although like most of you said im not sure if its worth £150 if you can’t interpret it.

    I also messaged DayTwo who i believe are the company mentioned in Clever Guts. They create a personalised diet for you based on how your blood sugar levels react to certain foods. Apparently they are only available to people in the U.S. and Israel atm. However they did say they’re looking to branch out into other countries this year and the U.K. was a strong candidate. Hope that helps!

  • posted by  HazelR on How much apple cider vinegar to take and how?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi there, I’ve had years of stomach problems following 2 eradication therapies with antibiotics for h pylori – I’ve had camera tests and scans and nothing really conclusive apart from a suggestion that it may be IBS. Pain and bloating first thing in morning even before eating anything, then bloating and pain for weeks on end. At minute I’ve cut out bread and pasta and biscuits and eating kefir (make overnight oats with the kefir and have it for breakfast- yummy with organic cocoa powder and sliced almonds and blueberries- or whatever you wish to add to the oats). I’ve read that ACV helps with stomach problems- how much is recommended per day and what is best method of taking it? I tried taking it straight and almost brought it back up it was so sour!

  • I am trying to figure out ideas that would be suitable for breakfast? I love my bread so it is going to be a case of omitting this, can anyone help with ideas or at least direct me as to what would be suitable for breakfast, as it seems that most breakfasts consist of carbs, porridge, cereal.

    thank you, appreciate the help.

  • posted by  Ancient Weaver on Protein digestion and the biome?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I discovered years ago that I had problems digesting casein, but back then no-one knew anything more that, that casein is simply hard for some people and especially babies, to digest properly.

    I forgot all about it until recent dietary changes, highlighted a correlation between millk consumption and indigestion, only now, much more is known about problems that can be caused by incompletely digested proteins passing into our bodies, and it is with some horror that I find there is a link between poor casein digestibility and ADHD, which I have.

    I know that the biome affects how well tolerated some otherwise indigestible sugars are, and is often mentioned in connection with ‘leaky guts’ so, my question is, ‘Does/can the gut biome have any significant effect on protein breakdown?’

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Clever Guts for Inflammatory Conditions
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Sorry to read this.

    Potentially yes. Clever Guts is a nutrient dense, wholefood diet that can – indeed should – be tailored or personalised.

    A key component is the detailed food and symptom diary. The longer you faithfully complete and analyse this, the better able you will be to identify links between flares and specific aspects of your diet and lifestyle habits. It is also worth recording things like physical activity levels, mood, weather/ season, sleep patterns, medication.

    You can use your diary to identify intolerances or triggers, to track the balance and variety of the diet, and to track your intake of food groups/ types that are particularly known to be anti inflammatory (eg. oily fish).

    HTH!

  • posted by  Susanma on Clever Guts for Inflammatory Conditions
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi
    I started the clever guts recently and it has helped my bloating/IBS a lot .
    I wanted to know if it might help with my IC?
    IC is an inflammatory condition in the bladder , and though I have had some good periods since my diagnosis 11 years ago, am currently in an awful flare up. Pain really bad and off work with it. Can the Clever Guts diet help ? I hope so!
    Thanks
    Susan

  • posted by  EatingMadness on Highly sensitive to nearly all food
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    If you react to potatoes I would definitely look at nightshades. I took out potatoes and tomatoes and didn’t realise there were also spices included. I have since learnt that and now avoid all nightshades. I am now looking into my medications to check those for nightshades too.
    Good Luck MissIntolerance

  • posted by  Summer08 on Shopping list for meal planners?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Agree – a shopping list would’ be helpful including alternative substitutes as some country’s may not stock certain ingredients

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on General Advice please!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi Katie

    1) Have you had your microbiome analysed? If not we are all steering blind to an extent, trying different and maybe conflicting things and second guessing
    2) Take a look at the 5:2 diet. It is profoundly anti-inflammatory, will help you lose weight and its entirely compatible with Clever Guts
    3) Post you food diary here. We might have some suggestions

    Good luck !

    Graham

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on General Advice please!
    on in Newbies
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    Katie_KLT: the best news is that you are very much on the right track with analysing your food diary!

    From your last post I noted that you were eating mainly higher sugar tropical fruits, but don’t mention low sugar ones (eg. red + blackcurrants, various berries, rhubarb). Also serving sizes may be off: a regular banana or apple is often two (UK serving 80g).

    You may have been replacing dairy and grains with processed/ lower nutrient/ microbiome unfriendly alternatives. Over the long term aim to use a really wide variety of nutrient dense wholefoods where possible (seeds, nuts, gluten free grains, sheep and goat dairy products, minimally processed coconut).

    This should mean you are not eating too many pulses for your gut to handle. You may find that, as the months progress, you can handle more and more pulses.

    From your food diary do also consider your past intake of foods rich in vitamin D, long chain omega-3s and magnesium (oily fish, more oily fish, organic eggs, certain seeds, cocoa).

    I mention this because vitamin D and magnesium balance and aid absorption of calcium (less well utilised if not from dairy), omega-3s are anti inflammatory and magnesium is key in muscle relaxation (inc.gut). So potentially important in successfully self treating IBS etc.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on General Advice please!
    on in Newbies
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    Katie_KLT: Buried in one of my earlier posts “Much more important are the guidelines on pages 189 to 196. Particularly note the comments of removing and reintroducing foods in stages or individually.” These comments are on pages 190 and 192 of the CG Diet book.

    To me the meal planners are examples only, since readers will have very different starting diets, possible allergies/ intolerances, health problems and goals and so on. Unfortunately the book is far from clear about not slavishly following the planners, and how best to use your food diary.

    Working slowly in stages is the only scientific/ logical way to use an elimination diet to identify food allergies or food intolerances. If you were following a very strict version *supervised by a dietician or allergist or other medical professional* foods would be removed or reintroduced one a time.

  • posted by  Katie_KLT on General Advice please!
    on in Newbies
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    Hi Firefox7275,

    I think I am getting more and more confused with this! I’ve looked at my ‘before’ diet and my reactions were mainly when I had gluten, wheat or dairy. I wasn’t eating much of this anyway as I knew it upset my gut and had already placed cow’s milk with soya milk and a lot of bread & pasta with GF alternatives. I ate a lot of fruit; 1 x kiwi, 2 x tangerines, 1 x apple and 1 x banana a day and had quite a lot of beans and pulses and I often suffered bad wind after these.

    I’m confused by how the ‘before’ diet works with the Remove & Repair phase? I am following the advised one week food plan on pages 262 – 263 in the book. It specifically says that the plan is low in dairy, gluten, wheat, pulses & grains (except hummus), so this is ideal for me as it cuts out things I know bother me. So I’m unsure why you say not to remove all of these things at once? I thought the meal plan was to be followed exactly?

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    Hi J-J,

    I’ve cut out legumes as per the Phase One diet plan in the book, all apart from the chickpeas used in the Rainbow Humus. Did you not have the humus at all?

    Thanks!