Latest forum posts

  • posted by  gowermonkey on olive oil
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Having seen the Clever Guts Book comments on Italian Olive oil I was minded to comment that as a regular daily drinker of olive oil the best I have found is GREEK . Apparently the most beneficial is that derived from the Koroneiki olive in terms of it being a good source of Polyphenols and Flavonoids, which help to fight against harmful free radicals.It also tastes as good as any I have tried and is “drinkable ” .I buy from http://www.maltbyandgreek.com . Perhaps these guys are worth checking out ? Be interesting to see if this is really the best in terms of health benefits – I cant say myself one way or the other and I have no interest in that company other than being a very small time customer .

  • posted by  Wellylass1 on A note from Michael on the book
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    hi all,
    Has there been any update on the brands of Olive Oil that are best to use? I’m in New Zealand, so looking for a brand available in this hemisphere!
    Thanks in advance.

  • posted by  Wellylass1 on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi
    I’ve just read the Clever Guts book and really interested to have my microbiome tested, does anyone know of any reputable companies that would service the Wellington, New Zealand area?

    Thanks in advance!

  • A while ago I chronicled a very interesting study called the SMILES trial, which investigated the link between depression and nutrition. It focused on what it called the Med-Mod diet, a (sort of) version of the Mediterranean diet.

    Here’s a little more information on the evidence linking nutrition and depression: https://www.amatterofsnacks.com/nutrition-for-depression-treatment/

    Do you think there’s a link between food and mood?

  • posted by  Texidee on Ulcerative collitis
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi Slaura, I’ve suffered the same disease all my life. I have regular colonoscopies and have followed the FODMAP diet. I highly recommend it. It was developed by an Australian university, and I believe Dr Mosley recommends it here too. I’ve only just started reading the book. You can purchase the FODMAP app for a low price, it’s easy to use and gives you a thorough guide of foods to avoid and then try re introducing, plus a meal plan and recipes. There are so many foods that I didn’t know caused terrible problems, such as corn! When having a flare up, I often follow their initial one week meal plan, it’s almost like a good detox. I start feeling better within a few days. I’ve learnt what my trigger foods are and avoid as much as possible. Best of luck to your Daughter in law, I empathise with her pain.

  • posted by  Topcoach on Microbiome stool testing advice sought for UK resident
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I used Atlas and found their product well designed and easy to use. The results are well presented and give detailed advice as to what you should do to change your diet. It also identifies areas where you are at higher risk of various diseases. I too was uncertain as to the scientific basis of the analysis and recommendations but, upon probing further, I found that a lot of work had gone into the product design and suggested they explain this in more detail for those customers who wish to know. Inevitably, my delving gave customer support more to do than they envisaged but they responded extremely well. Overall, very professional and good value for money.

  • posted by  Topcoach on Micro biome testing
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I suspect food allergies can only be identified if they are DNA related. For example, some people smell asparagus in their urine others do not. If you are short on cash I would recommend the biome test because at least you can see what to do with the results. In Michael’s book, he mentions various companies so you could shop around. I found Atlas “user friendly ” particularly for the non medical amongst us. Their customer support was extremely good and responsive.

  • posted by  trigel on British gut project results
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi,
    I would be VERY careful of taking Roaccutane, we feel that it has completely ruined his life! He never had any health issues before it, but had to be taken off it because he was severely depressed (bordering on suicidal), he’s not been the same person since. One day we were chatting about his mental health and we both agreed that he’d not been the same since taking the Roaccutane, and I said ‘I wonder if it’s connected?’. I then came across 3 fascinating programmes on the microbiome on Radio 4 called The Second Genome. Listening to them was a light bulb moment.
    Please research thoroughly, I regret not researching more myself before he took it, and we wish he’d never taken it. His skin was actually better when he came off it than when he was on it.
    Good luck with the kefir, we’re hoping that it might help. I’ll keep you posted x

  • posted by  ste92 on British gut project results
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thanks for the reply. I just googled the company, it’s the crowdfunded one right? I have not read this yet but I found a page about it on these forums so maybe they mention what to do to follow up? – https://cleverguts.com/forums/topic/british-gut-project/
    Are the results pretty clear to read? I was chatting with someone on the forums this morning who mentioned a company called Atlast and it’s almost double the price, I am wondering if, in terms of gut bacteria numbers and information like that, this one is the same for a cheaper price…

    on a seperate note can I ask if roaccutane cleared his skin even after coming off it? the doctors want me to try it you see. I don’t really want to mess my insides up anymore without knowing the current damage. However after 10 years using various things such as lymocyclin and a few others I have learnt that mine probably are not going to go on their own as soon as I come off the medications like I now have ( although I am trying to take Probiotics for a while and I already eat incredibly healthy so I will see how that goes first )

    Funny you should mention the Kefir as my grains arrived today for me to start making it. I am also using probiotic yoghurt and have also made some Sauerkraut!

    Please keep me updated on your sons situation if possible 🙂

  • posted by  ste92 on Micro biome testing
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thank you for the reply. Maybe in 3 months if I can scrape the cash together I will try it too. I was thinking the DNA test looked good too but the reason I had my doubts about their products.. they seem to claim they can do food tolerance tests from the DNA pack which is from your saliva. From previous research I was under the impression that all tests like that are not reliable in anyway, similar to the hair sample test. I hope I am wrong but I am sure I have heard that only properly done blood work can give you that information.

    Anyway, my point being, does that mean their tests are not as ‘reliable’ as they come across on the website…. Hopefully I am wrong of course as I would like to have some done. more so the microbiome one to start.
    Does anyone else know if this is a well reviewed company?

    I think there is a company mentioned in the book but I cannot remember who it is off the top of my head.
    Thanks

  • posted by  trigel on British gut project results
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    It was Roaccutane, he was only on it for 6 months, as he developed severe depression (which he’d never had before). He sent a sample to The British Gut Project (£75), but they don’t provide any medical or dietary advice. I believe there are commercial companies who do offer advice after testing, perhaps someone on here can advise? We have started using kefir, have a google, I bought a book called The Kefir Solution – Natural Healing for IBS, Depression and Anxiety. Kefir treatment is also good for the skin.
    He is starting to feel a bit better, his IBS (which we didn’t realise he also suffers from), has definitely improved and his depression also seems to be slightly better, although it’s very early days.
    Best wishes.

  • posted by  Topcoach on Micro biome testing
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi ste92. The testing mechanism was very well designed and easy to use (streets ahead of the NHS one). I think it took about four weeks for the results to come through but the company keeps you advised meanwhile. The results were presented through an app for my iPad and showed areas of risk rated from high to low and what you can do to improve your diet etc. It also shows a detailed breakdown of the gut bacteria, with percentages, and advice as to where to increase or decrease these. I discovered they use a traffic light system to rate the changes needed and how these are assessed i.e. Against a cohort of data (these were not immediately obvious nor explained and in my discussions with their support team I believe they are looking to make improvements). It would be useful to retest after a period to see what may have changed. The areas looked at were bacteria diversity, vitamin levels, dietary fibre and overall health. I also took the DNA test as a package. The results took longer to appear but were then overlaid. However, I am at a loss as to what you can do with the results apart from knowing the risk factors!

  • posted by  ste92 on British gut project results
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Sorry I am not much help to answer your question, but I would like to follow this thread as I have been on acne medication for about 10 years without realising it was actually antibiotics ( silly me I know..) Do you mind me asking what mediciation they had him on?
    Also where did you get this kind of test, is it at the Drs or a kit you send off and pay for. Thanks

  • posted by  ste92 on Micro biome testing
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    What information do they give you exactly in terms of your gut bacteria?
    Also did you get the gut microbiome test along with the DNA test they do as a bundle, or just the microbiome one if you dont mind me asking?
    I recently stopped taking antibiotics after about 10 years of been off and on them for back acne so now I am very worried my bacteria will be all kinds of messed up. So I am wondering if this kind of test would be beneficial for me? Although it does say wait at least 3 months after antibiotics to take it.
    Thanks

  • I’d be a bit sceptical of someone who said we are 99% bacteria when 60% of our body mass is water. About 90% of the living cells in our body are bacteria but that is a bit meaningless as they are much much smaller than human cells so are only about 1-2% of our body mass.

    https://www.popsci.com/science/article/2011-09/fyi-how-much-bacteria-do-people-carry-around

  • posted by  EatingMadness on Highly sensitive to nearly all food
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    I am doing better, not 100% but I feel like I am managing my diet better. If I avoid gluten, most dairy, sulphites, nightshades and solanine then I can cope day to day. The nightshades were key and can take 2-3 months to really show improvements, so if you’re looking at this food group and think it might be relevant then stick to a nightshade free diet for 3 months. The spices are key to avoid too – I accidentally had a small amount of paprika and felt awful later that day and it lasted for a week. My joints all seized up and it felt like my bones hurt too. I was moody and grumpy and achy for several days.
    I have also added a B12 oral soray and ubiquinol which has helped loads. I have an energy deficiency and on the supplements I gained a stone in 3 weeks whilst maintaining the same diet. I think this shows that I wasn’t digesting food and now am. I feel like my body is functioning properly again, which is great:-)
    It took a while to get used to this diet, but I can now eat out in some restaurants and know what sorts of foods to avoid completely. I am still eating mainly fresh food but have managed to add a few treats like the occasional coke. A big benefit has been the discovery of Orgran Flour – it is gluten and potato free, so I can now bake cakes that I can safely eat. That has added a new dimension to my foods which has been very satisfying:-)

  • Hey guys,
    I just came across Kale Brock, an australian gut health journalist and researcher that has great useful content when it comes to gut health and how to take care of your gut.
    He’s doing now a video series with nutra-life, thought you might find it interesting:

    Gut Health with Kale Brock

    Gut health journalist, researcher and documentary filmmaker, @kalesbroccoli takes us through this amazing series on gut health.In this episode, Kale discusses how our bodies are 99% bacteria – so the microbes in our gut, directly affect our fitness, immunity and happiness.Throughout this series Kale will be sharing with you his favourite recipes, how-to’s and lifestyle tips that you can use to transform your gut health from the inside out!….#kalebrock #gutrelief #prebiotics #probiotics #indigestionrelief #digestiveandimmunesupport #dailyhealth #highpotency #guthealth #healthyguthealthylife #nutralife #takechargelivewell #healthylifestyleeveryday

    Posted by Nutra-Life Australia on Sunday, September 2, 2018

    He also has healthy recipes on the youtube channel – the raw nutella is soooooo good

  • posted by  MissIntolerance on Highly sensitive to nearly all food
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    Hello GolfJumper – thanks for the prompt.

    Nothing has really improved unfortunately. Sometimes I know I’ve eaten or drunk something I shouldn’t have done – and suffered for it. Other times I really can’t work out what has caused the bad reaction. In relation to alcohol, this is quite a problem, but quite recently I had quite a bad reaction to Marmite and realised that it contains ‘brewers yeast’ rather than bakers yeast, so wonder if it’s actually the ‘brewers yeast’ in alcohol which is the specific trigger. Wine is the worst for yeast content, with spirits having less in. This may or may not be helpful to others!

    If I’m having a very bad day, I will have a couple of squirts of ‘Sudafed Blocked Nose’ spray. This works well for me in terms of quite a fast and significant improvement in my ability to breath through my nose , but it’s all chemicals, and there are lots of cautions with it about not using it continuously/too often, otherwise it could end up with the opposite effect. There a lot of different nasal sprays available and different ones work for different people, but they all need to be used with caution. I found reading the Amazon reviews very helpful before buying. I’ve also bought several that others recommended that did nothing for me. So it’s very much trial and error with them.

    I also use nasal strips at night (Breathe Right Congestion Relief) which help a surprising amount, as lying down is the worse for me. I cut them lengthwise which creates a narrower strip, but it still works just as well, so get double to number out of the box!

    I avoid tomatoes all the time, but do sometimes have potatoes. I’m not sure if potatoes add to my problems or not. As I mentioned earlier, sometimes I really can’t pin down the cause of my sudden sneezing fits and streaming/blocked nose. Certainly dairy doesn’t help as I do notice a worse reaction after ice cream in particular.

    I’ve also recently noticed a bad reaction after eating bakery products from Morrisons bakery, i.e. cheese scones, scotch pancakes etc. Really odd as you wouldn’t think products like that would have bad things in, but of course they use a lot of preservatives, flavourings, colourings etc. I’m not saying Morrisons use anything different from other supermarkets, it just happens to be the supermarket that I’ve bought them from and reacted badly to.

    Going right back to when I was having antibiotics and the concerns around them killing off the good bacteria in the gut, I now take ‘Lactobacillus Acidophilus’ which was recommended to me to help re-balance gut bacteria. No idea if it’s doing any good or not, but reviews were good on Amazon, so I take them!

    No magic wands for any of us with intolerances unfortunately, but it’s always good to look for ways to try and improve our situations.

  • posted by  GolfJumper on Highly sensitive to nearly all food
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    It’s been 9 no this since your last update and I’m sure a lot of people read your posts, as did I. Can you give an update on how you’re doing so we all can benefit from your journey?

  • posted by  Daze Off on Kefir problems – newbie
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Newbie Revisiting : About #Bio-tiful #KEFIR I discovered ‘Bio-Tiful from Morrisons, but I couldn’t buy it at the store, only on-line. So writing to ‘Bio-Tiful Dairy, they suggested Sainsbury’s…… Holy Mosley’s they have a good selection and flavours AND they also have another kefir from “The Collective” (same price, but different levels of ingredients – Biotiful has the most).

    As I initially was having difficulty finding Kefir, I only drank 2/3rds and refilled the bottle with warm Goats Milk and left it near the hob. When it seemed thick, I gave it a good shake, emptied 2.3rds again and refilled. The culture has been going and being consumed for 3 weeks, so I was in no hurry to chase Morrisons.

    Now that Sainsbury’s have BOTH makes, I’m keeping a few going in the way I said above.

    Q:??? Am I doing something dangerous?? Bad? or can I just keep going?????

  • posted by  badfoodrising on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hi! I would say just 5 grams of salt per 500 grams of cabbage is not enough- a tablespoon of salt is about 18 grams, and one tablespoon of salt is what is recommended by Holly Howe for about 600 grams of cabbage + 200 grams of extra veg/prebiotics. You have to have enough salt or you start getting bad bacteria and yeasts growing which can cause the slimyness

    Holly’s full sauerkraut instructions here
    https://www.makesauerkraut.com/sure-fire-sauerkraut-in-a-jar/

    more recipes
    https://www.makesauerkraut.com/sauerkraut-recipe/

    The weights should work fine, I actually use a crock which came with its own weights
    https://www.makesauerkraut.com/surefire-sauerkraut-in-a-crock/

    You’ll see there Holly recommends three tablespoons of salt for a 5lb 2.4kg mixture to fit in a 3l crock (or 2x 5lb mixtures for a 5l crock) – I used just under 2 tablespoons for a 1.6kg mixture for a 2l crock

  • posted by  Rubenesque on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    I do squash it until it is covered in its own brine – if I use 500g of cabbage I use 5g of salt – would that be right? I haven’t covered it with a cabbage leaf but I used the cabbage stalk to keep it down. Might not have been enough. Anyway, I have since bought some ceramic weights and hope that works. there’s a lot in this, isn’t there?

  • posted by  Ian Spencer on Home made Yoghurt
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    I would have thought so. I just use a cheap slow cooker, normal full fat milk & I don’t bother with the milk powder. I just heat the milk on low for 2 1/2 hours. Then I switch it off & let it cool for 3 hours. Then I add my culture from my last batch (I started with a couple of spoonfuls of Yeo Valley natural yoghurt). Then I cover the cooker in a blanket overnight. In the morning I have quite a thin yoghurt that I strain to make it Greek style. I end up with lots of Whey, the only use for this, so far, is to make my porridge. Any other suggestions?

  • posted by  Ian Spencer on Yogurt makers?
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    I just use a cheap slow cooker. It’s seems to work very well. There are plenty of easy recipes on You Tube. I prefer Greek style yoghurt, so I strain it but that leaves me loads of whey. So far I use that up to make my porridge in the morning. Has anyone any other suggestions for using whey?

  • posted by  badfoodrising on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    I only recently read about the garlic and ginger being detected as the main source of probiotic lactobacillus bacteria, rather than the cabbage, it was from a 2015 Korean study into Kimchi. LAB was found in 5/5 garlic samples, 3/5 ginger samples, 2/5 leek samples and only 1/5 cabbage samples, of which it was weak. So ability to act as a starter culture for LAB seems to correlate with the strength of the prebiotic, so I imagine other strong prebiotics like chicory root and Jerusalem artichoke might also work.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26133985

    I haven’t had an issue with slimyness with carrots, but I did have an issue with a beetroot sauerkraut I made in June-July, I think it was simply too hot, and I hadn’t used the coolbox method. How much salt are you using? Are you thoroughly squishing it all up and covering with a cabbage leaf and weight so the brine covers the whole mixture?

  • posted by  Rubenesque on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hi badfoodrising, I didn’t know about the garlic being the starter culture, I don’t think its included in the purple sauerkraut recipe in the clever guts book. I’ll try it in my next batch. So you use carrots all the time and don’t get the slimy texture?

  • posted by  Topcoach on Micro biome testing
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I have recently read Michael’s book Clever Guts Diet recommended by my gym buddy and decided to test my biome. I found Atlas Biomedical on the internet, a British company, and sent off for gut and DNA testing. They have a very well designed system and so far have proved very helpful, not only on the analysis but the recommendations as well.

  • posted by  trigel on British gut project results
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi,
    My son received his results from the BGP yesterday, and we’re confused about what to do. His results show that he has little diversity, huge quantities of Fermicutes, greatly reduced Bacteroidetes, reduced Proteobacteria and very little else. We suspect that his microbiome has been affected by a certain acne medication. He suffers from depression and we are desperate to get him well, is there anyone that can point us in the right direction? Thanks in advance.

  • posted by  badfoodrising on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hi Rubenesque 🙂 I’m not sure what they meant about inoculated! Carrots are absolutely fine, but, as with the cabbage I use only organic as keeping chemical residues as low as possible is advisable to create the best bacteria friendly environment. I usually use about three carrots, peeled, per cabbage, and three garlic cloves, and couple of inches knob of ginger if you like that. I would always use garlic and/or ginger with the cabbage as these are the main starter culture for the probiotics within the sauerkraut.

  • posted by  Rubenesque on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hi badfoodrising

    Thanks for that. I also read somewhere that using carrot can create that slimy texture if not inoculated – whatever that means. I am very new to this. I ended up putting the last lot in the compost and have started again with something very simple, just cabbage and will gradually work my way up. Great tip about the cool box (esky here): it has been warmer than it should be at this time of year.

  • posted by  malifriend on Kefir problems – newbie
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    It can take a while for kefir grains to settle down. I threw out the first couple of batches I ever fermented before I found the best place and temperature and time for my taste.
    The recent hot weather has been very difficult for making Kefir. For example I lost one batch when the milk had obviously started to go off a tiny bit before I added the grains. so the resulting drink was very cheesy.
    For my taste, what I like to do is to strain the grains just as the first tiny pockets of whey start to form at the base of the jar. Stir vigorously with a chopstick then strain. That gives a lovely pouring consistency. I store the excess in the fridge in flip top water bottles so the excess gas bleeds off as it forms as the second fermentation gets underway. The grains can either rest in the fridge in milk until needed or leave in full fat milk on the side to prep your next batch. My favorite milk is the homogonised Gold top – much easier on the digestions than regular milk.
    For loads of info join the Fermenting Friends UK Facebook group. Members of that group are happy to share Kefir grains, sourdough starter and loads of other fermented goodies too

  • posted by  Maxs on Ulcerative collitis
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi Slaura, I was diagnosed about 6 years ago, mild lower bowel. I agree with Wilf that alcohol is not good, particularly spirts and white wine for me. A glass or two of red wine is ok, but a not during a flare up. Since I started looking at the Clever Gut regime thinks have drastically improved and I felt my system within a couple of weeks was going back to ‘normal’. Had a major lapse after big night out with too much red wine followed by a take away Chinese (you can take a horse to water…), took three 3 or 4 days to get back on track. Cut out bread and pasta made with wheat, also dairy, although bringing that back in gradually, increased oil fish, which I love and regular use of turmeric. Reading some of the dietary tips for UC are quite depressing as they seem to cut out anything that looks health and has fibre in it. I’m pretty sure my gut bacteria was wrecked a year or so before I was diagnosed when I had a serious leg infection and ended up on IV antibiotics for 7 days and then oral for 6months. I’m determined to get my bacteria back and get rid of UC. Do lots of yoga and swimming and generally try to keep fit. Will keep you posted. Maxim

  • posted by  badfoodrising on Probiotics and Antibiotics
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Antibiotics MAY kill some good bacteria in your gut, so probiotics may help. Strains of different probiotics have been shown to be variously susceptible to or resistant to different antibiotics.

    https://academic.oup.com/jac/article/59/5/900/728499

    I would be somewhat cautious of most probiotic supplements as their supply and delivery chain is not as strict as for pharmaceutical medicines, so they may end up mostly killed off sitting in 40+ degree warehouses and delivery vans in the summer months. Shop bought yoghurt or yoghurt drinks aren’t though to be that effective in getting probiotics into the gut as they have relatively microbial count. Making your own yoghurt would be more effective (as Michael Mosley recommends), or Kefir (fermented milk) and Saeurkraut (fermented cabbage + garlic or ginger + other veg), or Kimchi (fermented cabbage, veg & fish). During hot months you may need to control the fermenting temperature with an icepack/coolbox setup.
    Of the commercial probiotics, Symprove, a probiotic drink, and VSL#3 and its European version Vivomixx available in either pill or sachet form are the only ones that I am aware of that have proven survivability in the stomach and gut (UCL study). You can order VSL#3 in a cooled delivery box from the manufacturer
    https://www.vsl3.co.uk/

    you can get VSL#3 and Vivomixx from Lifestyle Labs in a slightly cheaper chilled delivery
    https://www.lifestyle-labs.com/products/Vivomixx-Probiotic-450-Billion-30-Sachets

    I would only order Symprove from the manufacturer
    https://www.symprove.com/

    You should also try and eat and drink more healthily, so cut out junk food & processed foods, cut down on things high in sugar, including chocolate (even high cocoa% as that can contain fairly high caffeine levels), and stimulants such as energy drinks, non de-caffeinated coffee, tea, and alcohol. Make sure you also include some prebiotics in your diet – basically garlic (particularly dried), chicory root, and Jerusalem artichoke have very high levels, then leeks, onions, wheat bran and asparagus lower, chickpeas, oats, lentils and beans also. If you already eat those foods in decent amounts you probably don’t need to change anything. Eating a lot (10g+) of prebiotics can cause bloating & gas.

  • posted by  badfoodrising on Probiotics and Antibiotics
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Antibiotics MAY kill some good bacteria in your gut, so probiotics may help. Strains of different probiotics have been shown to be variously susceptible to or resistant to different antibiotics.

    https://academic.oup.com/jac/article/59/5/900/728499

    I would be somewhat cautious of most probiotic supplements as their supply and delivery chain is not as strict as for pharmaceutical medicines, so they may end up mostly killed off sitting in 40+ degree warehouses and delivery vans in the summer months. Shop bought yoghurt or yoghurt drinks aren’t though to be that effective in getting probiotics into the gut as they have relatively microbial count. Making your own yoghurt would be more effective (as Michael Mosley recommends), or Kefir (fermented milk) and Saeurkraut (fermented cabbage + garlic or ginger + other veg), or Kimchi (fermented cabbage, veg & fish). During hot months you may need to control the fermenting temperature with an icepack/coolbox setup.
    Of the commercial probiotics, Symprove, a probiotic drink, and VSL#3 and its European version Vivomixx available in either pill or sachet form are the only ones that I am aware of that have proven survivability in the stomach and gut (UCL study). You can order VSL#3 in a cooled delivery box from the manufacturer
    https://www.vsl3.co.uk/

    you can get VSL#3 and Vivomixx from Lifestyle Labs in a slightly cheaper chilled delivery
    https://www.lifestyle-labs.com/products/Vivomixx-Probiotic-450-Billion-30-Sachets

    I would only order Symprove from the manufacturer
    https://www.symprove.com/

    You should also try and eat and drink more healthily, so cut out junk food & processed foods, cut down on things high in sugar, including chocolate (even high cocoa% as that can contain fairly high caffeine levels), and stimulants such as energy drinks, non de-caffeinated coffee, tea, and alcohol. Make sure you also include some prebiotics in your diet – you can see from the study below which foods contain the most and which the least – basically garlic (particularly dried), chicory root, and Jerusalem artichoke have very high levels, then leeks, onions, wheat bran and asparagus lower, chickpeas, oats, lentils and beans also. If you already eat those foods in decent amounts you probably don’t need to change anything. Eating a lot (10g+) of prebiotics can cause bloating & gas.
    https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/129/7/1407S/4722578

  • posted by  badfoodrising on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    How long did you ferment for? Ideal minimum is 2-3 weeks, but you need to keep it around 18-22 degrees C. You also need to keep a ratio of 25-35% other vegs vs cabbage (less fermenting time if including extra vegs). As it was substantially hotter than this recently that may be the reason your ferment has gone slimy! To keep it cooler during hot conditions in the future you can put in a coolbox (lid off) with one or two freezer blocks not touching the jar, but on the inside of the coolbox.

  • posted by  Lynns sister on Kefir problems – newbie
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    If you leave it a bit longer to separate into curds and whey and then gently stir it as you pass it through the seive it should thicken. Strain it again if you think it still seems gritty. As another poster said, leaving it for a few hours lightly covered before putting it in the fridge should thicken it nicely. There’s a very useful Facebook page, Kefir UK with videos, tips etc.

  • posted by  UPJohnston on Probiotics and Antibiotics
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Do you recommend trying to support the microbiome with probiotic foods or supplements while one is taking a course of antibiotics? Or should one wait until after the course is done and then start? Are probiotic supplements better in that situation than eating lots of foods like yogurt and pickles etc (cheaper)?
    Thank you.

  • posted by  tamathews01 on Kefir problems – newbie
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Thank you for that advise 🙂
    i added another jar to the rotation, so i strain the grains put them in one jar with new milk then transfer the kefir to another jar and leave for 24hrs.
    It is not perfect, the kefir is a bit grainy. Not quite as thick as I would like but many many times better than before, it was pleasant to drink.
    And it is more than 1tsp I have, near 1.5-2, but it isn’t terribly warm in my kitchen.

  • posted by  Rubenesque on Fermenting hard vegetables
    on in Fermenting
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    Hello

    I chopped up red cabbage, one beetroot, one carrot, half an onion, added some dill and peppercorn and fennel seeds and it was all looking so beautiful and tasted terrific. But it’s slimy, I can’t eat it. What can I do to get rid of that texture?

  • posted by  HeatherB on Onions
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    I like onions in coleslaw and salads etc. However my body reacts very badly. I instantly get bad breathe if l eat raw onion and if l persist eating onions my guts swell and the resulting gas is a dreadful smell. I guess l haven’t got the right biome to cope. Does anyone know of a remedy other than total abstinence?

  • posted by  recoveringfatty on Kefir problems – newbie
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hi tamatthews01
    If you’ve only had your grains 10 days and they have tripled in size any you are throwing them away that is an impressive rate of growth (faster than I’ve witnessed!) so I’d think they are happy. Rather than throwing away excess grains you can eat them (I do this whenever I have spare)
    I don’t think you are letting it ferment long enough.
    To get thicker Kefir you may want to try letting it ferment longer, you still strain every day like you are doing but then put the Kefir back in a jar (leave the lid loose to let the gas out if you don’t like the fizz) and let it ferment another 12-28 hours (temp dependent) It should thicken (keep giving it a shake to check), mine still thickens even in the fridge. If I want really thick Kefir (similar to Greek Yogurt to eat with a spoon I let it ferment until it completely separates and then strain it in a fine sieve to remove the Whey, and eat the remaining thick Kefir.
    How many grains do you have to ferment the 250ml of milk? I have approx. 1 teaspoon full of gains which ferments approx 300ml of milk in less than 24 hours at room temp.

    Hope that helps