Latest forum posts

  • posted by  RussellE on FODMAPS = prebiotics ??
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hello. I’ve just read the book with interest, but I have a question on the theory.

    I know for pretty sure that the foods that give me the biggest problem are onion and garlic, especially raw. Garlic-infused oil seems to be OK. This fits well with FODMAP theory, which I was familiar with before reading the book. However I still get IBS-like symptoms (bloating mainly, especially in the early hours of the morning), with reduced severity and frequency, even when avoiding those and lactose.

    The question I have is that the theory presented in Clever Guts seems in some ways contradictory to FODMAP theory. It seems to suggest that those substances feed the healthy gut biota – they are prebiotics. Whereas FODMAP theory seems to suggest the organisms that eat FODMAPs are bad (because they produce gas), and we would be better off without them, but while they’re there, just avoid feeding them FODMAPs.

    Do the theories contradict or am I on the wrong track with the above?

    I want to give Clever Guts’ protocols a go starting with R&R, but I have two questions, one related to the above and one not

    1) I assume I should keep eliminating onion and garlic during R&R even though the book doesn’t say to do this?

    2) Is lactose-free dairy OK for R&R? I am very fond of my usual breakfast of home-made muesli with home-made yoghurt, which I make using lactose-free milk. (Yes it does work, somewhat paradoxically.)

  • posted by  Sighs of a donkey. on Kefir safety
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Thanks for this, Ellie.
    I have decided to continue with the Kefir. I think that often companies that sell products are keen for people to buy them, and that if more people make it much more cheaply at home, they probably worry about their business! I think a big problem is for many years people have been advised to over sanitise their lives, and everything has to be boiled or bleached beyond recognition as a natural product. I think we have suffered a s a result and it has affected people’s health in a negative way. Hooray for homemade Kefir! Long live Kefir!

  • posted by  Ellie Carstens on Diverticular disease and clever guts diet
    on in Newbies
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    Hello MamaKC
    I agree with the sound advice that Graham has given and would just add a couple of things. A friend who also suffers with diverticulitis has disasterous effects if she even eats tomato pips or even skins on apples or grapes. Unfortunately, what is considered to be a healthy diet can sometimes be detrimental as in the case of the tomato pips, so it’s being mindful of what you eat but any kind of probiotic would be extremely helpful. The only other thing I would mention is did your GP refer you to a Consultant for a confirmed diagnosis? I realise that you have had problems for over 20 years but it makes sense to see a Consultant who specialises in the gut and bowel. I do hope you have relief very soon.

  • posted by  Ellie Carstens on Kefir safety
    on in Fermenting
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    Hello
    I also read the article that advised having Kefir laboratory tested occasionally to check for infections and I too was concerned. However, like you I have been fermenting my own Kefir for a while and consider that the amazing amount of pro-biotics in the milk as opposed to yoghurt that only has around five, would outweigh any infection in the milk and that is the point of pro-biotics and as you say Kefir has the ability to kill pathogens. The fact that some people do what is called a double fermentation increasing the B Vitamins and increasing even more pro-biotics and to achieve this the milk is strained and that strained milk is then put into a clean jar covered with a muslin cloth and left for another 24 hours to ferment without the grains. Then any grains that may have formed are strained and the milk used in the normal way. Some people even use the same jar each time only cleaning it once a week as they say it kick starts the next batch. So if there was any real concern I cannot imagine that people would be leaving milk out on the kitchen cabinet for around 48 hours or using the same jar to ferment the Kefir without cleaning it. Plus the fact people have been making Kefir for many years using these methods without problems. I don’t have any concerns and will just continue to enjoy the benefits, hope you do too.

  • posted by  Sighs of a donkey. on Kefir safety
    on in Fermenting
    permalink

    Hello!
    I have been fermenting Kefir at home for some time. I read recently that it is wise to have your homemade kefir laboratory tested on occasion to check for infections that can cause health problems. I would be interested to know what people who make Kefir at home think about this. My understanding is that the Kefir bacteria kills pathogens, so as long as you are fairly clean with equipment, it should be fine. Seems many people around the world have been making this sort of thing at home for a long time without worry. Any ideas? Cheers.

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on Diverticular disease and clever guts diet
    on in Newbies
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    Hi MamaKC can you provide more details? What anti-biotics have you taken; can you be explicit about your gut issues and any ongoing treatment from your GP. Finally keep a two-week food/drink/exercise/sleep diary and post it. There are no simple solutions but almost everyone CAN be helped.. but you need a good baseline and the key data! Hope that helps. Graham

  • posted by  Nefertiti on H pylori
    on in Welcome
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    oops sorry I think I’m on the wrong section

  • posted by  Nefertiti on What to eat sauerkraut with?
    on in Fermenting
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    I agree it’s an acquired taste so just eat a little frequently rather than a lot all at once and hopefully it will grow on you. I didn’t like yogurt once but now I love it, same with broccoli.
    You could try adding it to other dishes so it’s disguised a bit too eg chilli, curry, stir fry etc.
    🙂

  • posted by  Nefertiti on H pylori
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Diagnosed with Helicobacter Pylori at Christmas. Due to HP becoming antibiotic resistant, current treatment consists of at least 2 different antibiotics plus an antacid. If that fails, more antibiotics. Having spent a number of years trying to build up my immune system by improving my diet I don’t want to wipe out all the ‘good’ bacteria as well as the baddies. Have researched the infection and alternative non-prescription treatments and don’t believe there is a proven natural cure, only hearsay. Has anyone been in a similar situation? ie feeling damned if I don’t take the drugs and damned if I do? Thanks for listening.

  • posted by  MamaKC on Diverticular disease and clever guts diet
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi everyone I am in my early 40s and have had some serious gUT issues for over 20 years. Recently I have been very sick with diverticulitis and I have had to take antibiotics and fast. I really want to overhaul my gut and I have been following the CGD guidelines plus been doing the 16:8 fasting. Is there anyone here who has healed their gut after diverticulitis or any advice ? Thanks

  • posted by  Pen on Prebiotics with an ileo anal pouch
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Thanks Graham, I’ll have a look at the Prof. I’m very grateful that you have taken the time to look at my post, apologies for the late reply!

  • posted by  Pen on Prebiotics with an ileo anal pouch
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Brilliant, thank you again Firefox and apologies for the late reply! I now own a lovely kefir culture, which seems to be agreeing with me very well!

  • posted by  Sarah Lang on Phase 1: ambiguous foods stage 1
    on in Newbies
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    Hi, I hear what you’re saying re the big picture,. After I’ve done the Stage One R&R, then the re-introductions, I plan to eat a more varied wholefoods diet. (I’ve interviewed Michael Mosley for a story on the science, and will be interviewing him next month re my experiences on this Clever Guts diet.) But I feel like I need to really get my head round what I can and can’t have while doing the Stage One ‘R&R’. I can’t slavishly follow the Meal Plans as I’m vegetarian (I have been managing to eat salmon, though), and I don’t always have time to cook a separate meal (my husband and son aren’t keen on my recipes) so often make something from the allowed ingredients. Also the Clever Guts recipe book has some ambiguities. For the stage one R&R, can you please clarify whether I can have black tea (or black tea with almond milk)? If I tolerate soy milk, is coffee allowed? Also in your post you say I can have beans/ lentils, but the recipe book says to exclude these during Stage One. The Stage One recipe for “Poor Man’s anchovies” (roasted potatoes) makes me think perhaps I can have some hot chips (fries)? Also, if you “slip up” during R&R by eating foods not allowed during this stage, do you need to start from scratch?
    Thanks,
    Sarah

  • posted by  Gigi60 on Biome testing in Australia?
    on in Newbies
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    If this was the case then all who follow a gluten free diet should be fine. I have 3 Coeliacs in my family and all have been on a gluten free diet for over 20 years and all still have gut issues.

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on Should I be taking this?
    on in Prebiotics
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    Without viewing the full report its not possible to express a view! Things are almost always more complex than they seem especially when you consider the sheer complexity of the microbiome!

  • posted by  Vibka on Biome testing in Australia?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi Graham,
    If you read the book “Grain Brain” by Dr. David Perlmutter, you would know that all grain that contains gluten will cause your pancreas to produce more insulin. That book is much cheaper than microbiome testing. It’s fine for people who have enough spare cash to do such a test, but I don’t think it is really necessary to test the microbiome. But that’s only my experience. 🙂

  • posted by  Guthealthnewbi on Should I be taking this?
    on in Prebiotics
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    I understand to boost my akkermansia muciniphila intermittent fasting
    But it also says to use acacia fibre twice a day for my prebiotic and colostrum powder and collagen powder as a gut healing supplement

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on Biome testing in Australia?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I can’t vouch for SMART DNA, but I can vouch for the testing (if properly done) – but it needs someone skilled in interpreting. Bear in mind that there is no set qualification or quality control for “naturopaths” – albeit I’m certain some are superb while others? Not so much.. But this betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of the Microbiome. Its almost always counter-intuitive and varies by individual. For example, having gone to Israel and having subscribed to the DAYTWO app, I now know that artisanal rye bread, which I adore and which I believed to be a healthy option, is an absolute “no no” for me – it spikes insulin. How would anyone know that without the microbiome analysis?

  • posted by  Guthealthnewbi on Should I be taking this?
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    I recently got my gut testing and was told I should be taking these supplements can some one give any feedback if it’s a good idea or not
    Pure 100% Hydrolysed Grass Fed Beef Gelatin Collagen
    Organic Prebiotic Acacia Fibre
    Pure 100% Colostrum Powder
    Any information would be greatful

  • posted by  ismac on Linseeds (Flaxseeds)
    on in Newbies
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    I’ve recently been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s and chosen the naturopathic route as a starting point for recovery. For years I’ve been putting whole linseeds in smoothies. My naturopath tells me that because the seeds are extremely hard & pointed they can cause problems in the gut lining. They may be OK if ground and cooked in recipes. She recommends chia because the seeds are round and soften up well when mixed with fluids. It’s a full-time job looking after yourself 🙂

  • posted by  Vibka on Biome testing in Australia?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi Debbie,
    I went with SMART DNA, but they referred me to a naturopath for an initial consultation and then she prescribed the microbiome test. Once the result came back we had another consultation and she then told me, that the microbiome test confirmed what I had told her. So the microbiome test wasn’t really necessary and I could have saved a lot of money. Since then I have consulted with Diedre at Naturally Dynamic Health in Albury (https://www.naturallydynamichealth.com/), who stated that the microbiome tests are not very reliable yet and that a good naturopath can help you balancing your microbiome without a test. So perhaps you might find someone in your area and save yourself a lot of money.
    Cheers,
    Vibka

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Biome testing in Australia?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    DebbieThompson68: You might select a service based on the recommendation of a medical professional (registered dietician/ gastroenterologist/ GP or pharmacist up on the research) OR on the company’s partners (Major university? Teaching hospital?) OR the founders’ credentials (experts Prof Tim Spector + Dr Jeff Leach + Prof Rob Knight = American + British Gut Projects).

    Higher cost may indicate a better quality or more personalised interpretation, considering *your* medical history. BUT do remember that this field is new and research is ongoing. Analysis is not a shortcut or alternative to your detailed food and symptom diary (p.187 + p.266-267) and advice of the aforementioned medical professionals.

    HTH!

  • posted by  debbiethompson68 on Biome testing in Australia?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi you can now preorder the kits from microba- they should be sent in June this year. It seems that although they are expensive at $419 Microba Insight™ is the only test in Australia that gives you the whole picture. While other services use 16S rRNA testing, which only sequences a small part of a single bacterial gene, Microba uses metagenomics, which sequences all the genes from the microorganisms in your sample. Its hard to compare like with likewith all the other testts available and $419 is a lot of money- a lot more than other tests. Any thoughts?
    thanks

  • posted by  debbiethompson68 on Biome testing in Australia?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi I went to the nutripath website and typed in CDSA5 test and no results. I looked at all the test available for gut health and there were over 20 – how do I know which one to choose. Thanks for your help. Debbie

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on Can kefir cause constipation?
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Kefir can quite radically effect your microbiome. If there is a clear cause-and-effect then you have your answer. Options are: reduce the quantity of Kefir you drink and build up slowly; stop completely and see how well you do with other fermented foods; and/or order some INULIN powder and see if that solves the problem. Good luck! Graham

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on Confused
    on in Probiotics
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    1) Get a really thorough and comprehensive microbiome analysis; 2) Ask your gastroenterologist about Faecal Matter Transfer. Good luck! Graham

  • Hi There
    It depends! The basic testing (cheap but limited info) is British Gut (try googling). You get a limited report and not much interpretation. There are several players in the market – and you get what you pay for to some extent. In my experience, whichever service you opt for you will still need someone to interpret the results and make suggestions. Are you happy to invest £200-£400 in which case there’s lots out there. There’s no need to physically attend a clinic. The sampling kit is posted to you and you post it back. Thereafter support can be by email, phone and Skype/FaceTime! Lots of options. Hope that helps. Graham

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on ROSACEA
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    Try googling GLADSKIN. I recommend it a lot and get some very good results – and yes there’s evidence!

  • posted by  GrahamSPhillips on Prebiotics with an ileo anal pouch
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Hi Pen
    I agree with everything Firefox has written. In addition there is only one (to be best of my knowledge) pro-biotic licensed for pouchitis- namely #VSL3. Its not cheap to purchase but is IS GP -prescribable for this specific indication (but its very much at the discretion of your GP. I’ve reviewed the evidence for #VSL3 in pouchitis and if it were me, I’d give it a go. In your circumstances I’d definitely consider a full microbiome analysis and I’d also follow Prof Ailsa Hart on social media.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Intolerance of some fermented foods
    on in Sensitivities
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    Have you completed the detailed food and symptom diary (p.187 + 266-267)? Ideally for two to four weeks since you have identified multiple possible culprits. Everything you eat or drink, with measured quantities and full product name/ brand such that the ingredients list can easily be checked. Analyse this yourself, or use to request a GP referral to a registered dietician or blood/ urine/ stool tests.

    Whilst it certainly is possible you have developed a sensitivity to one or more components of your diet – for example certain fungi/ yeasts or gluten – do keep an open mind. There are other ways alcohol intake above recommended daily or weekly limits affects our health even after we stop. Liver function (get tested), overweight/ obesity (inflammatory), poor diet choices (sugary or fatty or processed), undernutrition/ nutrient insufficiencies and so on. The alcohol itself and/ or the regular upset stomachs and/ or any medication taken for gastritis can affect the gut lining and gut microbiome.

    Things to consider in the analysis …

    Is your current diet properly balanced and very varied/ do you consistently meet or exceed *all* your country’s diet and lifestyle recommendations?

    Do you react to components of suspect foods (eg. raisins, bread flour, commercial yeast)? All alcoholic drinks or only ones made from grains or grapes?

    Do you react only to DIY or live/ unfiltered fermented foods OR to heat treated/ filtered mass/ pasteurised mass-produced fermented foods?

    If you are past the diary stage do note Dr Mosley and co “don’t recommend removing too many foods at one time, so it might be helpful to do R&R in several stages (p.190).

    HTH!

  • posted by  dohboy on Intolerance of some fermented foods
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    Hi all. Just wondering if anybody has any experience with a sensitivity to certain fermented foods?

    I used to drink quite a bit, over the past 7 or 8 years or so I noticed my hangovers getting worse and taking longer to recover from, at first I just figured it was an inevitability of getting older and I should either suck it up or cut back (or both!). I paired down my consumption over time with no improvement, even a single drink could make me feel lousy the following day.

    Once I stopped drinking altogether I realised other foods also make me feel lousy, notably white wine vinegar (even in very small amounts in cooking and on salads). I seem to be able to eat pickles/sauerkraut, kefir, cheese etc without issue, but recently fell foul of kvas (ever so slightly fermented bread crusts/raisins but barely alcoholic) and bread made with sourdough starter that had developed an alcoholic/acetone funk.

    Symptoms are headache/sinus pressure, fatigue, tickly cough, upset stomach – usually takes several hours for symptoms to come on, at their worst 24-36 hours later and can linger for days). GPs have no idea (stop drinking was about the most helpful advice I got!), Dr Google comes up with very little (although ‘leaky gut’ sounds like a potential culprit), most people chuckle and make a joke about hangovers when I mention it!

    It would be interesting to know if anyone has heard of this kind of sensitivity, but I’ve just read the Clever Guts book so will I will see if the change in diet to helps (omitting the stuff I know I can’t have). We’ll see!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Prebiotics with an ileo anal pouch
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Many nuts and some seeds are rich in omega-6 fatty acids, which are potentially inflammatory. So, if possible, slowly work towards a balance and variety of mineral and fibre rich foods (beans/ lentils/ wholegrains/ cocoa).

    Omega-6s need to be counterbalanced with sufficient anti inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids, especially the usable long chain format (oily fish/ eggs from seed fed hens). Oily fish and organic, free range eggs are our only dietary sources of vitamin D, which is key in normal immune function.

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in numerous health conditions, including autoimmune diseases. So a nutrient dense, anti inflammatory wholefood diet should work synergistically with your medical treatment. But again do consult a healthcare professional about any changes.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Pickled vegetables
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    In the past there likely would not have been as much distinction between traditional pickling processes and traditional fermenting processes. Both would have discouraged potentially harmful microbes, and permitted potentially beneficial ones. Similarly in the past all cheeses would have been made from organic and unpasteurised milk, and would have been ‘live’ when eaten.

    In general fresh (or fresh frozen) bright and dark coloured vegetables have health benefits because of their fibre, vitamin, mineral and antioxidant content. The bright and dark colour is an indicator of antioxidant content.

    Vegetables which have been processed or preserved may be equally or less (or occasionally more) beneficial, depending upon the individual veg and the method of processing or preserving.

    Some pickled or preserved vegetables will have been processed (inc. long cooking) such that the nutrients have been reduced or lost, and some will have enough salt and sugar added to mean that a sensible serving size is tiny.

    For safety’s sake I would encourage you to use recipes that are traditional and natural, AND are backed by someone with a solid background in microbiology, food technology or suchlike. Unfortunately randomly excluding some steps or some ingredients may render the end product unsafe.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Phase 1: ambiguous foods stage 1
    on in Newbies
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    Clever Guts and other balanced wholefood diets suggest that many Westerners need to substantially increase the variety of individual foods and food combinations (=meals). Breakfast especially: most of us eat wheat and/ or cows dairy and/ or refined sugar *every morning*. The more frequently we eat one food item the less frequently we eat the numerous alternatives.

    Yet some nationalities have spicy rice and/ or insects and/ or seafood and/ or vegetables. Savoury not sweet!

    It may take time to acclimatise to a truly varied diet, but we have the *rest of our lives* to work on being healthier. My sibling and I were raised on homegrown/ homecooked food but somehow left home skinny and picky! I was forced into lifestyle change by health problems, my sibling by their longed-for and long-awaited first child.

    Just keep experimenting, keep an open mind, keep working towards a nutrient dense, very varied, balanced wholefood diet. Keep on keeping on.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Phase 1: ambiguous foods stage 1
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Getting down to the specifics of your questions …

    Being hungry may suggest your current eating plan is not properly balanced and very varied. Ideally have a different breakfast, lunchtime and evening meal each day. If you have whole oats (steel cut or jumbo not processed ‘porridge’) have some raw soaked and some slow cooked. Have other breakfasts based upon seeds and nuts, or on other gluten-free grains and beans/ lentils, or experiment more with eggs, oily fish, other seafood, fermented goats or sheeps dairy products. These all supply protein plus fats and/ or fibres all of which slow digestion and keep us fuller for longer.

    Coconut: some forms are sweetened or refined, others whole so count towards your daily/ weekly (20-30 varieties p.191) intake of vegetables and fruits. In the UK dessicated, block creamed or toasted chips are usually whole, unsweetened coconut.

    Dark chocolate: in the UK this covers everything from 50-100% cocoa and 0-40% sugar or equivalent sweetener. Cocoa powder is loaded with minerals (esp. magnesium), fibre, antioxidants (make it bitter) and healthy fats. But added sugar and sweeteners should be minimised (p.188). So how much dark chocolate you have depends on the product.

    Apples and pears with skin: have a wide variety of produce, mainly vegetables (p.191) and the full rainbow (p.119-122). So ideally have low sugar fruits (berry mixes) limiting tree and tropical fruits. Half an apple or pear coated in lemon juice should not brown in the refrigerator.

    *to be continued, my smartphone hates long posts!*

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Phase 1: ambiguous foods stage 1
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I think you may be overly focussed on individual foodstuffs and not ‘seeing the bigger picture’. Clever Guts is a nutrient dense, *very varied*, balanced *wholefood* diet. Alongside these core principles the analysis of your unique detailed food and symptom diary should guide your unique journey to healthier, happier guts.

    Clever Guts is not prescriptive/ one-size-fits-all/ restrictive/ very rigid like many short term ‘detox’ or weight loss diets. Done right CG should fit, broadly, with the healthy eating and healthy lifestyle guidelines of your country. These cover serving sizes and frequency, maximums and minimums, encourage *balance and variety* with and between food groups and food types.

    It is great you are not slavishly following the example meal planners. But do take from them the huge variety of individual food items and of food combinations (=meals). Also that the reduction in starchy carbohydrates is balanced by an increase in healthy fats and complete proteins and prebiotic fibres. This maintains energy (=calories}, helps us stay fuller for longer and helps keep us regular (supports gut microbiome).

    *to be continued, my smartphone hates long posts!*

  • posted by  WendyLPB on Pickled vegetables
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hello,
    I am new, I started the fast programme this week. I thoroughly enjoyed Dr Mosley’s Clever Guts Diet book and love the recipes in the 8-week blood sugar book.

    I would like to start pickling vegetables. Please can anyone tell me whether they are as good for me as the fermented recipes, and or whether they are generally meant to be a healthy option?

    Thanks
    Wendy

  • posted by  Sarah Lang on Phase 1: ambiguous foods stage 1
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thanks a lot. In the Repair stage, can I have coconut and dark chocolate and if so how much? (I’m in the normal weight range but would like to lose a few kilos.) Also is black tea allowed (with, say, almond milk) or am I best to stick to herbal? And is an apple or pear a day ok or is, say, half of one the limit? And how much hummus is allowed? I don’t think porridge causes me gut problems so I’m having that for most breakfasts as I’m not that partial to egg/fish first thing. Is it normal when you’re used to snacking to be extremely hungry between stage 1 meals?
    Thanks
    Sarah

  • posted by  Pen on Prebiotics with an ileo anal pouch
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Thank you Firefox! I just realised I’d said prebiotics in my post rather than probiotics..

    I do eat loads of nuts and seeds although legume wise I mainly go down the chickpea route.

    I will look at the references in your post. I think for me maybe the probiotic has been a bit too much too soon!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Phase 1: ambiguous foods stage 1
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Which food types or food groups you avoid or limit in phase one depends, in part, on the analysis of your detailed food and symptom diary (maintained for *at least* a week, some of us need longer). Note that Dr Mosley and co. “don’t recommend removing too many foods at one time, so it might be helpful to do R&R in several stages.” (p.190)

    Fruit: avoid sugary varieties (tropical), include low sugar varieties (berry mixes), limit prebiotic rich, moderate sugar varieties (apples/ pears with skin).

    Oats do not contain gluten, but rather a structurally similar protein. Many with coeliac disease (true allergy to gluten) tolerate oats well. Whether you include oats depends on your food diary.

    Fermented soya products: whether you include these depends on your food diary. If you have been overemphasising soya products, or suspect they cause gut problems for you, remove and reintroduce them.

    Fibrous/ cruciferous vegetables: how they are cooked, how thoroughly they are chewed and serving size can all affect how well they are tolerated.

    Here in the UK the recommended serving size for fresh fruit and vegetables – inc. beans and lentils – is 80g. This is a HUGE pile of salad leaves, half an apple or banana, a few florets of cauli or broccoli. When reintroducing suspect foods do start with a quarter or half serving and work up slowly.

    Non dairy yoghurt abd cheeses: these tend to be highly processed and/ or contain sugar or sweeteners so limit these. If your food diary suggests you have no issue with probiotic rich dairy products (live yoghurt/ kefir/ traditional cheeses) you may decide to keep them
    in, or switch from cows milk cheeses to sheep and goats milk cheeses.

    HTH.

  • posted by  Sarah Lang on Phase 1: ambiguous foods stage 1
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi I’ve done my week’s food diary and am now on Day 2 of the Removal and Repair stage (aka Phase 1). There are a few foods that I’m not sure whether I can have or not in Phase 1, as the book says to avoid them, but they’re in recipes as “suitable for stage 1”. I suspect they might be foods you can have occasionally? These are fermented soy products like tofu and tempeh, rolled oats (given they contain gluten), and cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower, and non-dairy yogurts (e.g. coconut yoghurt). Also I can’t see anywhere whether I can have black tea? (though it wouldn’t be the same without milk). Also can you please recommend some non-dairy cheeses suitable for Stage 1? Plus are you limiting fruit at all?
    Thanks!
    Sarah

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on ROSACEA
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    You may find the threads entitled ‘Has the Link Between the Gut & the Skin Been Investigated?’ (Newbies forum) and ‘Long Term Lymecycline Use for Acne’ (Welcome forum) useful.

    There are different forms of rosacea with different underlying causes; triggers and severity vary from person to person. What all sucessful treatments have in common is reducing underlying irritation/ inflammation. Diet and lifestyle are highly relevant here.

    The first step for your wife is the detailed food and symptom diary (p.187 + p.266-267). Consider potential trigger foods, drinks or situations (see lists on the National Rosacea Society website), intake of pro inflammatory foods (sugars, refined or processed carbs, omega-6 rich fats) and anti inflammatory foods (oily fish, brightly coloured low sugar fruits & non starchy veggies, some seeds).

    Any supplement regime should be tailored to the individual, considering their medical history, diet and lifestyle choices. This means consulting the family doctor, a registered dietician, dermatologist or pharmacist.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on How does fasting affect the microbiome?
    on in Intermittent fasting
    permalink

    Have you read Dr Mosley’s book ‘The Fast Diet’? I have only dipped in, but the section entitled ‘The future of fasting’ (p.162-164) may interest you. You might also search PubMed, Google Scholar and other reputable medical websites for the impact of weight loss surgery on health, including that of the gut microbiome.

    The longer and/ or more frequent the fast the greater the risk that the body receives insufficient overall calories, proteins, essential fats, fibres, vitamins or minerals to maintain healthy organs and other tissues. There is fine line between strict fasting and starving: the less we eat the more important it is that meals are nutrient dense and balanced, and that the diet is medically supervised.

    HTH!