Latest forum posts

  • posted by  Fivenations on Yogurt
    on in Welcome
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    The easiest yogurt to make is one that doesn’t require a lot of heat – made with a Mesophilic culture. Ive just started making one with a Caspian Sea starter. I just wrap it ( kilner jar) in a towel and keep it in my bedroom as that’s the warmest place in the house other than the airing cupboard. It’s not as thick as some commercial yogurts but tasty and they say the bacteria it in survive further down your gut than many others.

  • posted by  supermum on kefir versus kombucha
    on in Fermenting
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    i have been taking kefir almost daily for the last two years (since starting the diet). But i hate it and treat it like taking medicine. Recently i finally got around to making green tea kombucha which i love. does anyone know if there are benefits (useful strains of bacteria) in kefir but not in kombucha? i want to decide if it is advantageous to keep having my kefir ‘medicine’. thank you

  • posted by  Richwillies on Hi – New_ Leaky gut advice
    on in Sensitivities
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    Hi mate,
    You sound very similar to me. One day I was relatively normal. Then it hit me, diarrhoea, food sensitivity, persistent loose stools. If I take high dose probiotics it helps a lot. But certain foods are a problem like coconut, lactose etc. Yes the bloody so called superfoods seem to upset me. Next step is to get a stool sample tested again.

  • posted by  kanders on Hi – New_ Leaky gut advice
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    hi eveyone, I am new here.

    I recently bought the clever guts diet and it makes not only does it make sense it helps me to determine that i may have leaky gut.
    I have struggled with IBS over the years, which seems to be getting worse. I started to follow the low FODMAP diet which is very helpful and can be sure that things like onions are not ideal for me least not over the past few years. Have been dairy free for years and recently went gluten free. (august.) Id like to say i felt better but my stomach still has issues.

    I thought id try some of the recipes in the book, but am have quite bad reactions to some of the food,
    i tried the green Flaxeed bread, which was very painful before i even finished eating:
    yesterday i tried the healthy gut green smoothie, and still painful now.

    If it is leaky gut is there more recipes i can get to help. I am at the moment at the point of wishing i did not have to eat.
    Broth is good, and nice on tummy, but it isnt enough to keep me going for long.

  • posted by  Debrapb on How much dark chocolate?
    on in Newbies
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    so how much dark chocolate should you be eating every day? A square? A bar? I don’t eat sugar so want to eat as little as possible to get the benefits – thanks!

  • posted by  Haleyann on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi Firefox7275,

    Apologies, I have only just seen your reply. Do you mean I should keep a food diary to be sure that I am getting the right amount of each food group?

    Thanks for the tip about being physically active. I have started to take up yoga and powerwalking as I can’t face running anymore.

  • posted by  Haleyann on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi George S

    Thanks for the tip. I haven’t tried digestive enzymes yet so I’ll definitely give it a go.

  • posted by  George S on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi Haleyann,

    I know this has been a little bit of time now but just wanted to recommend Bioptimizers. They have a range of products which help encourage good gut health. I have been taking specifically masszymes and P3-OM and they have fixed my problems.

    Hope this helps.

  • posted by  Wacker on Eating on the bike
    on in Newbies
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    Hi All,
    I’m two weeks into the Repair Phase of the CleverGuts Diet and looking for advice on food (vegetarian) I can take in while cycling. My rides can be 2 to 3 hours duration, and although Michael’s advice is to avoid snacks between meals, I need to refuel during these rides.

    Any advice or suggestions welcome.

    Cheers,
    Wacker

  • posted by  Helena Casey on Dried fruit
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hello everyone, I’ve been reading the Clever Guts diet book as I have a bit of a sluggish digestion. I don’t need to lose weight, I power walk for an hour every day, eat tons of fruit and veg and healthy food. I drink more wine than I should but also drink tons of water. My question is about whether my intake of 2 or 3 dried figs at night is a good or bad thing for digestion. I eat them to help me and I love them but maybe they’re not the best for me. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

  • posted by  Cole on Not sure where to go from here
    on in Newbies
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    Hello, I am not sure what my next step is and looking for some help and advice. I have just last week been informed by yet another doctor that there is nothing wrong with me, apart from my stomach being overactive in producing stomach acid, and I just don’t understand. I grew up on a farm and until I left home at 17 had never heard of IBS or reflux and yet here I am. Even though I do have some symptoms of IBS it is not severe unless I eat peas. My main reason for buying the Clever Guts book and reading it is because of reflux. MY doctor tells me it is sign of age and there is nothing I can do apart from taking the medication. No one wants to explain to me why this is happening. I have severe reflux even when my stomach is empty and even a glass of water can cause it to flare up, bloating my stomach and making me feel really horrible. It has brought me to the edge and I don’t think I can go on like this. I am taking the highest dose of Nexium I can and still I feel sick. If I eat raw garlic or onion (in any food) I will have a reaction so bad I will eventually throw up. I exercise every day, walk about 3 to 4 km, and don’t eat junk food, but the one thing I have a hard time with is trying not too eat too much, as having my stomach fairly full, does relieve the symptoms for a little while at least. I have tried the 2/5 diet and lost quite a bit of weight, about 8kg, but found that it stopped working after time. Just not sure if the Clever Guts Diet is for me, as most of the things in the recipes will not be what I can eat. Just want to know if anyone else has problems with reflux with or without the IBS as well and what they have tried, that might work. Thanks

  • posted by  GeorgieGM on Sweet
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thanks so much for taking the time to reply. I will look into it…

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Sweet
    on in Newbies
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    Key to the success of Clever Guts is breaking our reliance on (or addiction to) sugar, processed grains, sweet meals, baked goods, and on snacking. The meals and recipes are intentionally savoury, or at least not overly sweet. Do re-read the relevant sections in the book, especially pages 150 to 155.

    Porridge oats used for flapjacks are heavily processed: they are cut, steamed and dried, losing quite a bit of their fibre in the process. Unfortunately the high-fibre truly wholegrain alternatives (eg. jumbo oats, steel-cut oats) don’t easily stick together in a bar.

    I would not suggest forcing yourself to eat high-sugar dried fruit that you do not actually like. Having said that you might try unsweetened dried pear, sour cherries, golden sultanas all of which have a much more complex ‘fruitier’ flavour than regular raisins, brown sultanas or dates. You can also get a host of berries freeze-dried.

    If you have a good Middle Eastern/ Indian/ Pakistani grocers in your area you should be able to find skinless roasted aubergine pulp in a can or jar, though I would check for salt. Alternatively make a triple batch of aubergine pulp and freeze it, reducing the steps in the brownie recipe. An alternative to aubergine in brownie recipes is cooked beetroot. A good food processor is a Godsend for easier chopping and mixing.

    For simplicity consider 85% or 90% cocoa dark chocolate as it comes. OR melting 85% or 90% chocolate over your choice of: cacao nibs, chia seeds, cracked linseeds, sliced almonds, toasted chopped hazelnuts, finely chopped dried fruit, freeze-dried berries. Or you might melt the chocolate over the ‘Nutty Cinnamon Granola’ (p.198) if you make that.

    Lastly in the ‘Clever Guts Diet Recipe Book’ there is ‘Chocolate & Walnut Bites’ (p.202) and in ‘The Fast 800 Recipe Book’ there is ‘Fudgy Chocolate Bars’ (p.233) but, again, these are clearly marked as occasional treats.

    Sorry if I haven’t really helped!

  • posted by  GeorgieGM on Sweet
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi there, I am changing what I eat bit by bit and have been doing some recipies in the book.
    I am looking for healthy and very easy to make sweet chocolate type or cake, muffin, flapjack type food. There is one in the book I like but I can’t stand sultanas or raisins and it looks complicated. I can just about stomach dates I think. I want to be able to make a batch of something that will keep for a week and I can take with me on the go.
    I love the seaweed muffins but they are not sweet.
    I do have difficulty with cooking due to a condition so it needs to be easy to do with not too many complicated ingredients or steps.

    Big ask I know! Worth a try… thank you.

  • posted by  Emma38 on New and need some help!
    on in Newbies
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    I am in Australia and despite that we have the highest rate of vitamin D deficiencies. We thank the cancer council for doing an amazing job warding us against skin cancer! I am on a doctor prescribed supplement and as part of my thyroid care regime I get my levels checked regularly.
    I’ve recently re-discovered linseed/flaxseed oil as a great alternative to fish oil for omega 3. It’s also been found to be just as effective as fish oil.
    I am in the process of having a stool sample (ruling out parasites and bacteria) taken and when I get the results from that I will speak to my GP about checking some other levels of things.
    I have also started a food diary again to keep an eye on things. This was how I worked out I was lactose intolerant in the first place.
    I am going to start the reboot and repair diet in the book after I’ve spoken to the GP about my current test results.
    Seeing a dietician is on the cards after my next appointment with my GP. Anything specific that you suggest I can be tested for??
    Thank you so much for the info and you’ve given me a bit more to think about in terms of deficiencies

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Analysing the detailed daily food and symptom diary is much more than identifying triggers, important as that is. Nor just amount of fibre, important as that is. Every food group, within the food groups. For example Dr Michael Mosley advises
    “At least seven portions a day of veg and fruit, made up mainly of veg … Variety is important for gut health, so try to eat 20 to 30 different varieties a week.” (p.191)

    From my last post “… properly balanced and very varied, anti-inflammatory wholefood diet. Ideally we would get a variety of different fibres and other prebiotics from just such a diet ….. They may be ineffective or partially effective if the underlying diet is off. …. dietetics and nutrition to analyse the balance, variety and composition of their patients’ diets.”

    Physical activity and formal exercise overlap but are NOT synonymous. Being physically active when you are in discomfort or pain is absolutely a challenge. Swimming, aqua aerobics, slow walking, stretching, tai chi, hot yoga, gentle gardening, gentle dance, routines intended for the elderly even though you are not!

    Any amount, any pace/ intensity, different temperatures, just moving as gently as you need to, little and regularly all day. The human body evolved to move: research shows it is essential for health completely independent of fitness.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on New and need some help!
    on in Newbies
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    Essays are good! Loads of questions ….

    Have you ever done a detailed daily food and symptom diary? Have you (re)started one yet (p.187)? Have you ever been referred to a registered dietician? Have you had bloodwork recently (inc. as many micronutrients as they will test for + inflammatory markers)? Which country are you in? How much strong sun exposure do you get? What can you eat and are you eating?

    Dairy, veg, chicken …. breast particularly is shockingly low on all micronutrients (minerals/ vitamins/ essential fatty acids/ phytoantioxidants). See the Self Nutrition Data website.
    All Dr Michel Mosley’s books/ plans are properly balanced and very varied. As many nutrient dense wholefoods as possible.

    Seeds, certain nuts (low omega-6), beans, lentils, organ meats, whole organic eggs, low sugar fruits and non starchy vegetables in the full rainbow of bright and dark colours. Introduce new foods/ increase variety and serving size very slowly as recommended in the book (p. 192).

    Your history screams micronutrient deficiencies/ imbalances, systemic inflammation to me. The insomnia and long hours are stressful, feeding into the inflammation. But without any fish, seafood and seaweed …. Yes I know how serious/ lethal anaphylaxis is.

    Medical/ pharmaceutical grade supplements or topicals from a registered dietician , medical doctor, allergist, pharmacist **considering bloodwork and food diary.** For safety’s sake, do not self prescribe please. Even vegetarian long chain omega-3s are marine algae extracts. And algae = seaweed.

    Hashimotos = vitamin D3
    Inflammation = long chain omega-3s
    Atopic eczema/ contact dermatitis = both
    Psoriasis = both
    Leaky gut = inflammation, vitamins A and D3

    Maybe vitamin B12, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc …?????

    HTH!

  • posted by  Emma38 on New and need some help!
    on in Newbies
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    Hi all,
    I’ve just recently bought the clever guts book, I have a list of ailments and am hoping this helps my symptoms…
    I’m allergic to fish and shellfish- as in anaphylactic, I used to be a chef and had to give up due to this developed allergy. Whilst I was a chef I had contact dermatitis and I do suffer with small bouts of psoriasis, as a child I suffered eczema.
    I also have hashimotos hypothyroidism, I’m recently lactose intolerant and am starting to think I have an issue with casein as well.
    Despite cutting out lactose of my diet I still suffer cramps, bloating, diarrhoea/constipation.
    I have had every scan I can to rule out any physical problems that can cause all my symptoms, I am now thinking it’s in my gut. I’ve had a leaky gut in the past and earlier this year I suffered with a parasite in my gut, which I healed with homeopathic methods as my body doesn’t respond well to western medications, if there’s side effects I will suffer from them.
    I’ve come to the clever guts family for some advice on tolerating kefir with lactose intolerance- does anyone have any issues with this? I’m thinking of just going with a coconut kefir so I don’t have to “trial” it, although sometimes when I have coconut oil based products I get bloated also ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ also the clever guys diet for repair contains a lot of fish so I’m hoping I can just replace this with chicken/vegetables. Also due to my fish allergy I can’t tolerate seaweed.
    Sorry for the essay!! 😁😁

  • posted by  Haleyann on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi Firefox7275 thanks for the response.
    I have kept various food diaries since this problem began 18 months ago, and they did help me identify a couple of problem foods such as oats and apples but despite eliminating these the problem still persists. I try to be active on a daily basis but it is pretty difficult on days when the pain is bad. For the record I was a lot more active before these problems started (I ran every day and I went fencing once a week) so I don’t think inactivity is a factor in why this has happened to me.

    I was actually slightly underweight when I started the Low Fodmap diet so losing more weight was hardly ideal.

    Yes you are certainly right about GPs not knowing much about dietetics and nutrition. I should probably have mentioned that I was referred to a dietitian who recommended the Low Fodmap Diet. Before putting me on that I had to provide a food diary so she could check that the problem wasn’t just a general lack of fibre in my diet (afte rall this would probably have been the easiest way to solve my problem).

    While I take your point about supplements just being add ons, I am a bit desperate and willing to try anything. As far as I can see I am doing everything right in terms of diet and exercise so I don’t know what else to do.

  • posted by  BlancaBrana on Not that newbie … but a couple of questions.
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thank you so much again, fantastic follow-up. I have decided to subscribe to the Fast800 Programme. This way I can have the proper follow-up. I will definitely be talking to my GP. I am glad I have all the books, but I am sure the programmer will be best for me for now.
    Wholeheartedly thankful, most helpful answers / advice.
    Blanca Estela

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Have you been completing a detailed daily food and symptom diary (p.187)? Are you physically active on a daily basis? Did you need to lose weight for your health when you began the low FODMAP plan?

    The ‘Clever Guts Diet’ is a properly balanced and very varied, anti-inflammatory wholefood diet. Ideally we would get a variety of different fibres and other prebiotics from just such a diet. Supplements are just that: add-ons. They may be ineffective or partially effective if the underlying diet is off.

    Doctors are not specialists in lifestyle healthcare, but rather medical specialists (diagnostics, prescription medication, surgical treatments). Most do not know enough about dietetics and nutrition to analyse the balance, variety and composition of their patients’ diets.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Haleyann on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    I think in general my fibre intake is pretty good (lack of fibre in my diet would have been the first thing that doctors would have picked up on before putting me on low fodmap). I have to admit though, I haven’t really looked much into prebiotics beyond the section mentioning them in the Clever Guts book. I’ll have a look into Bimuno, and let you know if I have any success.

    Thanks for your help!

  • posted by  recoveringfatty on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi Haleyann
    How about Prebiotics? You have it covered but I wondered if your fibre intake is sufficient? those good bacteria in the Probiotics need something to feed them. Maybe Bimuno or similar would be worth trying? I’ve seen reviews stating some people with IBS have had some success with it.

  • posted by  Haleyann on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi recoveringfatty,

    Thanks for your reply. I probably should have mentioned in my intro that I am nearly finished with the three month course of Symprove, but it hasn’t really helped. I know that it is one of the better probiotics out there but maybe it just doesn’t contain the right strains for me. Is there anything else that anyone can recommend? Also, has anyone had their microbiome tested and did it help at all?

    A bit more background, I have had all of the usual tests done (endoscopy, scans etc.) and everything came back normal so my problems aren’t caused by any tangible health problems.

    Any advice you can give would be great!

  • posted by  recoveringfatty on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hi Haleyann

    I have no experience of it but I came across Symprove, it appears quite pricey but it seems to have good reviews and some reputable backing.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Symprove-Active-Bacteria-Daily-Supplement/dp/B0086VZ8S4/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=1T4KS9FHCFK0B&keywords=symprove+probiotics&qid=1567539258&s=gateway&sprefix=sympro%2Caps%2C482&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExRVhGNTVROERYSkdTJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwODQyNTgzM01WTEhYT1pCSDFPViZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwODU4NzAzOEQwUURMM0VKWUZKJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

    Hope that helps

  • posted by  Haleyann on Probiotics for IBS C
    on in Probiotics
    permalink

    Hello,

    I have been suffering from IBS C for a while now, without much relief. I have already tried the low fodmap diet (other than causing me to lose a lot of weight it had no effect). I already eat Sourkraut and Kefir regularly, but I was just wondering whether anyone knows of an effective shop brought probiotic that is good for IBS C? I’m in the UK if that is any help.

    Thanks

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Not that newbie … but a couple of questions.
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Given that you are in the ‘obese’ range at present I would suggest trying ‘The Fast 800’ diet. Steadily losing fat around the abdominal region should reduce systemic inflammation and reduce the stress on your liver.

    If you feel able to, you could try Stage 1: Very Fast 800 for the two weeks suggested by Dr Michael Mosley then reassess (p.124 & p.142). That would take you up to the liver ultrasound date anyway. You might then decide moving to Stage 2: The New 5:2 is better for your family, and better for your overall nutrition.

    Targeted nutrition for mental health at this time of year includes wholefoods rich in vitamin D3, long chain omega-3s, magnesium, zinc. So plenty of oily fish, other seafood such as oysters and crab, chia seeds, low sugar dark chocolate, cacao nibs. If you can cook with the bones of the fish and the shells of seafood, you will get some extra
    minerals in the broth to help replace the cows dairy that you do not tolerate well.

    People with fatty liver and with obesity are often low in vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D3 and zinc again. Some experts also suggest increasing antioxidant rich wholefoods: these include bright and dark coloured non-starchy vegetables and low sugar fruits in the full rainbow of colours, low sugar dark chocolate, cacao nibs.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6170520/

    Everything I have listed works with Dr Michael Mosley and Dr Clare Bailey’s recommendations in ‘The Fast 800’ and the ‘Clever Guts Diet”. Hopefully your excellent GP will agree!

  • The analysis of my microbiome has led to interesting results but it was not clear on the meaning of the high value of the Phylum Cyanobacteria equal to 18.2% which is very different from the average of the recorded values (a few percentage points in general). The relative Class is 4C0d-2 and Order is YS2, but family, genus and species not classifiable.
    The other results are 45% of Bacteroidetes, 33% Firmicutes, (Cyanobacteria 18%), others about 4%.
    I also read the article Di Rienzi et al, Di Rienzi et al. eLife 2013;2:e01102. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.01102, regarding Cyanobacteri in the human gut, but I did not find answers to my question. Can anyone give me clarification on this anomaly can it be advantageous or disadvantageous? Or can you tell me some scientific studies to consult? Thank you

  • posted by  BlancaBrana on Not that newbie … but a couple of questions.
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thank you for your reply.
    I appreciate your quotes from the books, that helped me to increase my understanding. I have now highlighted them on mine, as a reminder.
    1. I Have a BMI of 38 which is obese. I know I need to loose weight, I have been loosing slowly. I lost almost 4 kilograms on CG phase-1. It has been recommended that I loose weight and got to a 31 BMI when I did 5:2.
    At the moment my GP has had focus on finding out about what is causing the liver values slightly increased in the last 2 blood tests. I am going for a liver ultrasound now on the 17th of September and retaking the bloodwork too. In order to have a clearer understanding of what is happening and if there is the need to refer me to a specialist.
    I am thinking after re-reading on my Dr. Mosley books, that a proper Fast 800, will improve my health.
    2. Yes I did maintain the diary and have come to understand that cow milk products are not good for my gut. I have eliminated all dairy products. Except for Greek yogurt and goat chess, which I eat anyway a very low amount.
    3. Yes, absolutely I did with 5:2 I (and my family) enjoyed the variety and felt we ate whole-food and varied. We have kept some of those recipes as part of our diet. I would say for me in particular I did also focus on not going over the 500 – 600 calories on the fasting days.
    4. I am in Norway, and I think I will benefit from a “targeted nutrition”. Can you elaborate how can I do that. Are you thinking I will benefit of following the 12 week program of “Fast 800”? I have been wondering about it myself.
    I am fortunate to have a brilliant, wise and caring GP, so I will be followed up anyway.
    Thank you again and looking forward to your answer / advice.
    Blanca

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Cyanide poisoning from Flaxseed
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    It is worth focussing on quotes from the scientific experts if you can, because journalists can alter the key message by removing qualifiers, adding dramatic words or otherwise changing the emphasis. The Daily Fail is a major culprit, especially in headlines and subheadlines.

    A later, more measured, article focusses on children
    “Europe’s food safety watchdog plays down flaxseed cyanide danger”
    https://www.foodnavigator.com/Article/2019/08/21/Europe-s-food-safety-watchdog-plays-down-flaxseed-cyanide-danger

    Earlier article, but based on the same report
    “EFSA issues second cyanide in food opinion”
    https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2018/11/efsa-issues-second-cyanide-in-food-opinion/

    The Green Flaxseed Bread recipe makes ten to twelve slices, so <20g per serving. On the example meal planner this recipe crops up on alternate days, BUT there are other recipes in the CG books which contain ground flaxseeds.

    Have you been maintaining your detailed daily food and symptom diary (p.168)? If yes, how much ground flaxseed are you personally consuming each day?

    HTH!

    .

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Not that newbie … but a couple of questions.
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Well done for getting your focus back!

    Has your family doctor suggested that you lose weight? Are your BMI and waist circumference measurements in the ‘healthy’ range, ‘overweight’ range or ‘obese’ range?

    In the ‘Fast 800 Diet’ Dr Michael Mosley says “It is designed to provide a simple, effective way to shed fat and set yourself up for a healthier future.” (p.11).

    Whereas in the ‘Clever Guts Diet’ Dr Michael Mosley says “it is about the sort of food and lifestyle changes you should make if you have gut problems.” (p.9).

    Were you been maintaining the detailed daily food and symptom diary (p.187) during your recent CG phase 1? Do you believe that you were eating a properly balanced and very varied wholefood diet when doing the 5:2 plan, or focussing more on calorie counts?

    Given that you have struggled with your mental wellbeing – stress/ depression – it might be wise to focus on targeted nutrition if you are in the UK, since we are coming into Autumn and Winter.

  • posted by  TrishM on Cyanide poisoning from Flaxseed
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi,
    Having read an article in the Mail on Sunday about the amount of cyanide in Flaxseed, should I stop making the Green Flaxseed Bread in your book ? (Since it contains 200g of Flaxseed !!!!)
    Trish

  • posted by  dohboy on Intolerance of some fermented foods
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    Thanks, this is something I’ve wondered myself but like you say GPs not knowledgeable on the subject.

    Has your son found anything that helps aside from cutting down on high histamine food?

    Anything to counteract the effects on the occasion of a glass of bubbly, or a properly dressed salad for that matter? 🙂

  • posted by  SairaA on Intolerance of some fermented foods
    on in Sensitivities
    permalink

    Dear OP, you may already have the answer to your issues as some time has elapsed since you first posted but just incase, I read this and it sounded like it could be related to histamine intolerance (my son has this and he has similar symptoms to what you’ve described). Histamine is high in alcohol, fermented foods and can also be found in other foods. Worth having a look at this if you’re still looking into this. Most GP’s don’t know much about this unfortunately. We’ve had most useful information from a dietician if that helps.

  • posted by  BlancaBrana on Not that newbie … but a couple of questions.
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I have done 5:2 with great success and also the fast beach diet. The stress and depression happened.
    Now I am a 57 year old woman.
    Have done phase 1 Clever guts, after some liver values where slightly high. I am being monitored by my GP just now. I have informed her about my nutrition, which she means is good to keep the focus on that also as I am being monitored. I want to contribute to my own “health-liver-recovery”. I am a moderate drinker (1 wine glass a week), no alcohol from now on.
    MY QUESTION IS?
    Health wise, will I benefit more of following the Clever guts lifestyle or is it better to move to the new fast 800?
    Are familiar with both, which one will contribute more to improve my liver values.
    Thank you.

  • posted by  nickyshepard on Keto?
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Hi, Keto diet is considered to be a highly effective diet for losing weight. You need to cut your carbs and eat low-carb foods. The ketogenic diet encourages also the elimination of refined and processed carbohydrates.

  • posted by  Thanful1 on Plant Paradox, Dr Steven Gundry
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    I would be interested in being in touch with people who are following the plant paradox by Steven Gundry.

    I met somebody who is following the plant paradox who told me how helpful it has been for him, I have also looked at some of the book and have found it very helpful. I’m in the UK and would like to be in touch with others in the UK who are following this to talk about where we can source some of the things that are mentioned .

    Would love to hear from anybody in general who’s following it. Thank you.

  • posted by  Pearsey on Anyone have or heard of blastocystis hominis?
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi Sister4
    It is hard to remember the exact details but I think I started to feel an improvement after a couple of months and felt better after about a year. I did not increase my activities gradually but found that I was able to do more as my health improved. I know that some of the medical profession thinks that graded exercise helps a sufferer of CFS to get better but when I was ill I found that trying to do a little bit more each week just set me back and made my fatigue worse. I would pace myself and would make sure that I allowed plenty of rest time.
    I am back to a normal routine now. I do not have as much energy as before I was ill but I am 8 years older and now 62 so that is understandable! I can look after (with my husband’s help) my two toddler grandchildren two days a week. I can go on a 6 mile walk with the dog. I can meet up with my friends and spend 3 hours chatting. I don’t think I could work full time (luckily I could take early retirement when I became ill) as I still need days when I am not as busy.
    I would be very happy to discuss things with your sister when she feels up to it.

  • posted by  nickyshepard on Anxiety and sleep
    on in Stress, sleep and mindfulness
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    Hello, your thanks for sharing your post. According to researches, data shows the effects of sleep deprivation which is a link to weight. There is a variety of food intake that should be followed which is helpful and improve your sleeping habits.

  • posted by  Thanful1 on Chronic fatigue
    on in Newbies
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    I also have the same condition ME/CFS and I’m not able to get online very often, only with help, but would like to meet others following the plant paradox program with Dr Gundry. It’s easier for me to use the telephone rather than the internet but obviously I can’t find the audience there! Wondered if anybody would be willing to swap phone numbers via a private message, so that we can chat on the phone please.

    Wishing you all the best and thank you for your help.

    Thankful1

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Rice v quinoa
    on in Newbies
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    By all means substitute ingredients you dislike but try to maintain a really wide variety in each food group or food type: here wholegrains, pseudo-grains, beans and lentils (if you tolerate them).

    What type of rice are you substituting? Ideally have brown, basmati, long grain or black rice (not white rice, sticky or glutinous varieties). The insoluble fibre and resistant starch content act as prebiotics and help support a healthy microbiome.

    HTH!

    .

  • posted by  wishtohelp on Chronic fatigue
    on in Newbies
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    Hi, I”m a carer for a CFS daughter, housebound, often bed bound 5 years. Her GP had put other CFS patients into remission but couldn’t help much. Then I came upon http://www.cfsremission.com run by a US citizen scientist, Ken Lassesen, who’s a professional AI expert and passionate about cfs – AI because he crunches Pub Med papers, not people’s silly theories and opinions. You get your gut bacteria tested (we use Ubiome because they’re specific and precise and cheaper than most) then log onto his website & get PERSONALISED suggestions to suit your particular bacteria – herbs, spices, meds that might take your gut the wrong way, but could take it the right way. It’s free. I can’t believe in this world that such benevolence exists. My daughter’s up and about! Going shopping with me today!Not remission yet, but happier and looking towards a future.

  • posted by  surfergirl on Gastritis
    on in Welcome
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    Hi Silverslippers,

    Thank you for telling your story, glad there is still silver linings out there.
    It does make life hard when you do the right things and it doesnt fix the problem. Im glad you found out what was causing your symptoms, i think this is the hardest part for patients, there are so many doctors and so many diagnosis that are wrong or misdiagnosed or even just a single part of the problem.
    Thats an amazing cure time, 20 mins.
    I think 12-14 months is about the normal waiting time for a public wait list. I had an Endoscope four months ago after my time on the waiting list, and was diagnosed with gastritis, which i have been prescribed a PPI for six months to stop the irritation of the gut lining but the only advice to stop the cause of the irritant was stop eating symptomatic foods. I dont think this will be a long term solution to my problem.
    Since reading your post I am wondering if i will have to come for a holiday to Sydney and see if I can get an appointment at the Centre.

  • posted by  Pdeacs on Rice v quinoa
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Is there any disadvantage to swapping quinoa for rice in your recipes? I’m not a big fan of quinoa.
    I just made the Lazy lemon chicken on pg 130.