A note from Michael on the book

  • posted by GrahamSPhillips
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    Hi Everyone I have threaded some replies below La Shy’s questions:

    how much saurkraut and or yogurt is a good amount? Do we know that both of these and the other pro-biotics make it past the acids and into the large intestine? Evidence seems spotty as far as I can tell.

    GRAHAM: I think you are looking for precise answers where there are none! The human body (+microbiome of course) is too complex to give absolute answers. But that doesn’t leave us clueless. The general advice in Michael’s book is spot on. But the answers vary very specifically by individual:

    This is where MapMy Gut (or similar) come in. Only by determining which bugs are in your gut and in what abundance can you answer the question “which is the best diet for me”. I’ve been researching this for years plus I have the advantage of having a health-professional and scientific background. There are no absolute answers which is why I’ve just sent off my own stool sample to MapMyGut in order to understand what dietary changes I should make

    The seaweed study was phenomenal for some of us who have psoriasis but also as a nutrient but how mcuh seaweed should we combine into our life and what kind (there are multiple types)

    GRAHAM: Find a good and recognised source and stick with it. It’s trial and error (at least for now)

    How cold does rice and potatoes need to be to become resistant starch and for how long? Some on the internet say frozen for 8 hours and others just say less than 130 degrees or does the food need to be cold and then re-heated and reltated, what is the calorific impact of resistant starch or (and this is another question) are we no longer living in a calorie counting world and if that is the case, how do we adapt

    GRAHAM: In the fridge overnight according to Michael’s study on Trust Me. As for calorie counting? Most people would say its less and less relevant. Get your diet right; move in the right ways and weight should look after itself. Forget calorie counting at least for now

    It seems pretty impossible to remove all processed and preserved foods from our life because they are everywhere including in basic things like crackers and often bread or even pasta, (cold or not). What is essential to avoid and what is just okay and what is the impact of some of these products on the microbiome and is there a way to compensate…

    GRAHAM: I recommend Prof Tim Spectors book “Diet Myth” for some answers

  • posted by La Shy
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    Thanks for all of the responses!! I appreciate your taking the time. I also appreciate that there are a lot of unknowns and that each individual is different. (Thanks for the video Graham)

    Just to be clear, my questions were a function of my natural curiosity and also trying to see how best to implement this in my life. I travel a lot for work during some periods and that means planning. So the source of my food is not always clear to me although I do try to make good choices when living in a hotel.. Fermented saurkraut is not on every menu. I also cook quite a lot at home when I can (lentil soups, curries etc.) but tend to freeze larger batches to re-use the next week. Knowing if this impacts the nutritional/microbial value would be helpful. I also make sushi at home sometimes which (bonus!) seems to be a great food for the microbiome (oily fish (have also made kimchi rolls), seaweed, and resistant starch (rice)…so knowing if the sushi rolls need to be refrigerated for a long time or just cold before eating to make them insulin resistant and extra healthy is actually useful for me. I used to only make this rarely because of the potential insulin response from rice but for my family this could be a really good way to get in a lot of goodness if we can avoid the insulin response especailly as diabetes runs in the family. Anyway, those are some examples of why I’m asking the questions I am asking…but I hear you that there aren’t any hard and fast rules…

    Here is an interesting article on Resistant Starch with a lot of references to actual research for anyone else with a curious mind and a Ted Talk video that pretty much summarises some of the key research explained in the book. Enjoy.

    https://chriskresser.com/how-resistant-starch-will-help-to-make-you-healthier-and-thinner/

  • posted by GrahamSPhillips
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    Interesting! I highly-recommend Rob Knight’s Book Follow Your Gut

  • posted by 1303liesl
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    Shaila:

    Amazing the difference knowing the ‘whys’ makes! (No, that’s not a criticism – I think we all do it to a certain extent – don’t give all the details because we’re replying to something/posting something on a forum.) Yes, I can see that being in hotels might pose problems, at least when I go to Germany there’s always plenty sauerkraut around! My other diet-and-fitness guru, Leonard Morehouse, said that the best diet anyone could follow would be to eat as wide a variety of foods as they could get their mitts on, but moderation in all things. Even 40 years down the line, his advice not only still holds good, but appears to be confirmed by modern dietary thinking, at least, the thinking of folk like Michael Mosley, not the clowns who dream up faddy diets for the gullible!

    And I didn’t fully answer your previous question re potato starch: yes, it is still working! Not only that, I forgot to take it last night (didn’t realise until I got up and found the still-clean glass!) and had a simply dreadful night, far and away the worst I’ve had since starting.

    Re your comment on some potato starch being potato flour: my bag is marked ‘Potato Starch (Farina)’, which would suggest that it is, in fact, potato flour. However, I’ve used potato flour before for cooking, and this stuff seems to be completely different, both in texture and in how it reacts. (Now there’s a thought: I wonder how it would work as a thickening agent for rote Grütze? Must try it next time! Sorry, thinking aloud, as it were!)

  • posted by littlefrog
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    where can I get a microbiome sequence in Australia, can’t find this information

  • posted by GrahamSPhillips
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    Just google “microbiome sequencing service in australia” ?

  • posted by Alan B
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    Tried that but for UK. Got loads of results with most seem to be suggesting ‘pay money and discuss the results with your nutritionist’.
    One wanted £347 plus VAT with a six weeks wait…
    So far as I can see, none do the same as the Weizmann people and suggest which foods to eat or avoid.

    Early days, perhaps.

  • posted by skinnykins
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    Yes, I believe the service is only available in the UK and USA and a paid service. I don’t know any free ones.

  • posted by Alan B
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    The Personalised Nutrition Project has been licensed to http://www.daytwo.com. It is only available in the US ($299) and Israel. They say they are going to expand to other countries.

  • posted by GrahamSPhillips
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    I was in Israel recently and saw the DayTwo app for myself. Very impressive. But even with the app you’ll likely need someone to help interpret the results and advise. For the UK my preference is Tim Spector’s mapymygut – you get the right information and someone to help interpret it for you and advise as part of the scheme

  • posted by Alan B
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    I’ll look into that.

  • posted by Firefox7275
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    Dietetics/ nutrition is a specialised field; tailored advice needs to consider the individual. Age, gender, lifestyle, current diet, diagnosed medical conditions, prescribed medication, etc, etc. Avoiding or increasing one food type can throw the balance of several nutrients off, necessitating adjustment in other areas of the diet or even supplementing.

    Similarly the lab work in sequencing the microbiome requires expensive equipment and the time of skilled technicians.

    For anyone who can’t afford or justify the cost of personal advice – inc. me! – next best is reading the Clever Guts Diet and other books by the experts from the American and British Gut Projects.

    Getting the gut microbiome sequenced is not a short cut or fast track to better health. Ultimately we would still need to overhaul our diets, and measure success by improved symptoms.

    To use changes in the microbiome as a measure of success means budgeting for regular testing.

  • posted by GrahamSPhillips
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    I agree with you Firefox7275: it is a specialist field. That said, without the mapping , you are steering blind. While the advice in Michael’s book is excellent it is simply not possible to say what is a good diet for any one individual without knowing anything about your microbiota. I’ve just sent off my own sample for this reason and I’m awaiting the results with interest. One of my Israeli friends had her microbiome mapped by DAYTWO. There is no way you could have predicted what the results would be without the mapping – the outcome is often not what you expect.

    Fascinating !

  • posted by Gilli Robbins
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    I work at a Fairtrade shop and the Zaytoun olive oil from Palestine is very pure. It’s picked by hand from 3 different areas and comes in various forms including Organic. It’s not cheap but tastes really good. http://www.zaytoun.org

    Gilli

  • posted by Supergrandma
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    I would like to be involved in the potato starch project too please.

  • posted by eBoof
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    I thoroughly enjoyed the book. There is a probiotic that was developed with the help of the University of Queensland called Perkii. The bacterium used in the probiotic is lactobacillus casei (Lc431). Perkii calims to use technology called Progel that encapsulates the bacteria which it allows to pass through the small intestine unaffected and it passes to the lower intestine and colon.
    https://perkii.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/The-Geeky-Stuff-PERKii-Science-Brochure.pdf

    This raises questions to me. Have you heard of this? How “good” is the bacteria used? I’ve included a link to a pdf about the product.

    Awaiting comments.
    Cheers
    Rob

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