Latest forum posts

  • I have just scrolled through all the posts from 2017 – 2018. Did this study ever get off the ground and does anyone ever get a reply? I am also interested.
    I will be visiting the UK from Australia in September. Does anyone know where I can get my Microbiome tested as there is not much happening down under (please excuse the pun).

  • posted by  silverslippers on Gastritis
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi Surfergirl – and others,
    Well, it’s been a long journey. Things went from bad to worse and I was diagnosed with IBS for which I was doing everything, diligently, to manage. However, nothing worked and I became very depressed and wondered how I could even keep on working. It’s a whole world of sufferers out there.
    I live in Sydney Australia and I heard, from my chemist, about The Centre for Digestive Diseases. I made an appointment with Professor Borody who believes this is essentially an untreated long term infection often from C Difficile. I had to wait 14 months as people come from all over the world to see him. I had a colonoiscopy and was subsequently given two antibiotics to take, one made by a compounding chemist, the other a fairly obscure antibiotic. Within 20 mins of taking my first dose the bloating started to subside, then the gas reduced, the burning went away and over the next few days all symptoms virtually went. I was elated yet just waiting for it to come back. I didn’t believe that could so “simply” be the answer. It was. Early this year I had a bout of gastro and the symptoms came back albeit very mildly. Enough that I recognised the distinctive body sensations and feelings… including depression. I immediately took a short dose of the meds and have been symptom free ever since. This, to me, is a miracle. I still follow everything Dr Mosley advocates – not always strictly but do believe that if you’re following all the guidelines and still have considerable problems there’s something else going on and a lot of this is as Prof Borody says. The walls of his office are papered with testamonials. I will be forever grateful. Good luck to all of you!

  • posted by  kimmaree on gastroperisis and hypoglycemia
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hello All, I have alot of reflux problems had 2 operations, a pyloraplasty to open the other end of my stomach so food can go down due to gastropersis (paralysis of verve in stomach). My question is I can try the fasting however I have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar level) has anyone have this condition and still do fasting because I find it difficult.
    Can you get the test kit in Australia I cant seem to find link n website.

    Thanking you in advance.

  • posted by  surfergirl on Gastritis
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi Silverslippers,

    I would love to hear how you have fared since your initial post.
    I have recently been diagnosed with gastritis and am planning to reset my bi ome, I would also love to try the daytwo test but it is still unavailable in Australia.
    Also who was the website that did offer fecal testing in Australia please?

    I had thought i was a fairly healthy young Aussie, decent diet, try not to eat heavily processed foods at all.
    Possibly a stress problem as Im a huge worrywart.

    Hope you have identified your triggers and reset your biome succesfully, would be great to hear more.

  • posted by  coffeequeen on New and excited!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Lovely to read these posts.
    I did start off rather well but, by February I got caught up in helping a friend with a new business venture.
    Little did I know how time consuming and stressful it would be. Consequently I neglected my own needs, my diet and the psoriasis came back with a vengeance.
    So I took a two week holiday.
    Plenty of sun, swimming in the sea, relaxation, lots of fruits and salads (meat free) and olive oil. I’m pretty stable now and have picked up the book again ready to get back on it.
    I’ve also taken note of the seaweed suggestion by Argussie and will be adding this to my plan. 🙂

  • posted by  manyanna on New and excited!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thanks for the reply and clearing it up for me. I will try it out, hopefully starting tomorrow and will repost results. Fingers crossed.

  • posted by  Argussie on New and excited!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    If you look in the Seaweed and Psoriasis thread on this website, you will see that Pia Winberg gave this advice on 5 July 2017. It worked for me last year and this year it has worked for me again. Yes, I consume 2 1/4 sheets every day. Last year I blended it into homemade vegetable soup, but this year I’m taking it without the bother of soup. You will need to blend it into something liquid because it is too dry to chew on it’s own. I notice a reduction in itching from the start, and then the flaring up just stops. I have been taking it for five weeks and am more or less clear right now. Please post again if you try this and It works for you, as I try to tell people about this and nobody can be bothered to listen.

  • posted by  manyanna on New and excited!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Argussie, I’m interested in trying the nori seaweed drink you mention. Do you drink the amount you mentioned (2 1/4 sheets) everyday? It sounded a bit much so I’d like to confirm it please. Also have you seen any difference or is it too soon? Thanks for your help, manyanna.

  • posted by  Argussie on New and excited!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    My psoriasis is seasonal, and for the parts of the year when I have a particular problem, I drink a daily “seaweed smoothie” which reduces my psoriasis to almost nothing. I buy sushi nori sheets in the World Foods section at the supermarket. One packet contains five sheets weighing 11grams in total. I liquidise 2 1/4 sheets (5 grams) in a glassful of hot water to make an odd but not completely disgusting daily drink. I see excellent results within five weeks of starting. I have had psoriasis for sixty years and this is the only thing that has ever helped me.

  • Thanks for your advice, Firefox. I will start keeping a food and symptoms diary as you suggest and also re-read the clever guts and fast800 books. I’ll look what MM says about the night fasts too as I hadn’t thought about that

    Ps I’m discharged from the hospital. I discussed with my GP easing myself off omeprazole as I didn’t like the risk factors of its long term use and he told me to stop them – no tapering off. He said, well if you get the symptoms again, you can always come back here. I got rebound symptoms for about a fortnight and it’s all settled down now

  • Although all prescription medications have potential side effects, some are very safe over the long term. Please discuss the implications of going drug-free with your pharmacist and/ or the prescribing doctor beforehand.

    As far as I can tell, Dr Michael Mosley’s ‘The Fast 800’ is the updated version of ‘The Fast Diet’ (5:2) and the ‘Blood Sugar Diet’, so you would not need to combine them.

    Have you got back into maintaining your detailed daily food, activity and symptom diary as recommended in the ‘Clever Guts Diet’ (p.187)? If you have you could use this to review the balance and variety of your current diet, what calories and macronutrients (carbs/ sugars/ protein/ fats/ fibre) you consume on average, and how your serving sizes compare to recommended ones. Only once you know where you are can you determine where to go next.

    In both the ‘Clever Guts Diet’ and ‘The Fast 800’ Dr Mosley suggests extending overnight fasts as a way of easing in to longer or stricter fasts. You might (re)read the two books, mark out sections and discuss with your hospital consultant, registered dietician or family doctor.

    HTH!

  • posted by  bloodsugardiet (CG Admin) on Strange forum posts – site hacked?
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi! It’s spam — sometimes it gets through our spam filters and needs to be manually cleaned from the site. If you see any dodgy posts, you can use the “report post” link and we’ll take a look and delete it! Thanks. 🙂

  • Hi,
    I’ve had several posts on here going back to the early days of clever guts. As my name suggests I Keep Trying – to sort out my digestive health, my weight and fitness 😀

    In February I was diagnosed with acid reflux, hiatus hernia and and inflammation of the oesophagus as well my usual IBS issues. All this was following a fairly stressful time where we’d had a year long drawn out building project to do an extension and new kitchen, we had no kitchen for a large part of this time and too many ready meals and overly processed foods.

    Six months on, I’m much much better – I just have be careful and not to eat too many carbs. I want to lose some weight to help reduce the reflux, and get myself fit and healthy. So I’m wondering what would people recommend as the best approach to help me lose weight – 2 stone. I’m thinking of a combination of Fast 800, 5:2, and Clever Guts diet.

    The advice I got from the hospital was to eat smaller, frequent meals and to try to lose weight. I was prescribed omeprazole, and once I started to heal, I weaned myself off them because I’m concerned about the long term use of medication. Doing a low carb Mediterranean style diet helped too.

    I’ve kept to a more or less low carb mediterranean diet and I enjoy it and I think it’s why I feel so well, but I’ve not lost weight, nor have I put any on. I think doing fast 800 programme 5:2 might help me shift the weight but I’m worried about fasting and reflux symptoms returning. Does anyone have any experience of reflux and hiatus hernia and weight loss methods? Thanks for reading

    Does anyone have any experience of doing 5:2 with acid reflux and a hiatus hernia? Would it make it worse or not?

  • posted by  wholefamilyprod on Anxiety and sleep
    on in Stress, sleep and mindfulness
    permalink

    Yes, anxiety and sleeping disorders are such a nuisance. They affect our lives and work. Magnesium plays a vital role in primary insomnia, for those who are suffering from it can try it as a night time regime.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Starting Phase 1
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    With a strict elimination diet it quickly becomes impossible to eat a properly balanced and very varied diet as Dr Mosley recommends, and that is needed for health. For safety’s sake a full-blown elimination diet must be medically supervised.

    Your first step is the detailed daily food and symptom diary for *at least* a week before you start, with everything weighed and measured (p.187). This will help you determine which food group or food type is potentially problematic and thus should be eliminated first.

    Dr Mosley and co “don’t recommend removing too many foods at one time, so it might be helpful to do remove and repair in several stages” (p.190).

    If you already avoid dairy you can continue to do so, but ensure you take whichever supplements your family doctor, dietician or pharmacist has recommended. If your issue is lactose intolerance you should be able to reintroduce traditional aged cheeses once your gut has rested. These are very low in lactose, yet loaded with gut-friendly probiotics.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Charlorre on What book
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    May I start with saying thank you very much for replying to my question, and it was done in such depth and so easy for me to follow.

    I actually went out after I had posted the question and funny enough bought the two books you mentioned well actually I bought 3 the other one is called CIS I think Thats what it’s called as I haven’t looked at it yet as I am going through the clever gut first.

    The funny thing is I use to always be very fit with running and kayaking, but somehow at the age of 58 I seem to have lost myself with looking after the family and moving to 4 different countries with my husbands job that I didn’t think for one minute to make sure I was eating correctly, the worse thing was I was reading the gut book and eating a bounty bar with a gin and tonic 🤭 so I have only myself to blame.

    New book new hope and again thank you for your reply.

  • posted by  meliemoo on Starting Phase 1
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi All,

    I’m about to start Phase 1 to reset my gut and want to ensure I’m doing it correctly.
    Am I to cut out all; dairy, gluten, pulses, brassicas etc?
    The book says to cut out problem food groups in this phase but then it also says to avoid all so just not sure what to do? I already avoid dairy but not really sure what my problem areas am thinking of cutting out all of the above mentioned to be safe and then slowly introducing one by one.
    Any help would be appreciated!
    Thanks,
    Mel

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on 16:8 morning coffee replacement
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Recoveringfatty: I would direct anyone to read Dr Mosley’s books again. In ‘The Fast 800’ he explains the differences between a very low carbohydrate or ketogenic diet, and a low carb Mediterranean diet (p.88-p.103).

    Any eating plan should be healthy, nutrient dense, properly balanced and very varied. This is more difficult to achieve the harder you cut calories, or cut carbs, or cut fat.

    Cream is high in fat …. and little else. By contrast full-fat dairy such as live Greek yogurt or traditional French cheeses are a source of protein, essential micronutrients and probiotic micro-organisms.

    HTH!

  • posted by  Marshalll on What is your #1 challenge with your gut?
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    I’ve tracked this forum back over several years and still observe frequent requests to participate in the potato starch survey.
    It appears that there is not going to be one so would suggest that interested would be participants conduct their own test and indicate their progress on this forum… I have been taking a teaspoon of potato starch in a glass of water at night and have observed a considerable decrease in arthritis in my fingers… I haven’t really noticed any significant improvement in my sleep patterns…

  • posted by  lizzygirl66 on 16:8 morning coffee replacement
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    hi recoveringfatty
    wow, you really have this worked out well. congrats, great effort and commitment. I drink lactose free milk but only in my 2 to 3 coffees a day. I just don’t like the taste of full cream milk, makes me want to pewk. 3 stone is fantastic weight loss. I haven’t lost any weight as yet, not that I am really counting as I am more focussed on healthy eating rather than losing weight. I have also have increased my physical activity substantially therefore can feel muscle building more than anything else. thanks so much for your reply, it is greatly appreciated to hear your great schedule and how others are doing it, hopefully someone else has something to offer. 😀

  • posted by  recoveringfatty on 16:8 morning coffee replacement
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi lizzygirl66
    I’ve not ditched milk totally just avoid it during the 16hr fasting window which means my morning coffee’s. I vary my routine between 16:8 and 5:2 So three days a week I do 16:8 (actually more like 17:7 as I have evening meal hopefully before 8pm then don’t eat until 1pm the following day) and 2 days a week I fast until the evening meal. At weekends I eat ‘normally’ but avoid sugar mostly. My weights pretty steady, I lost over 3 stone a couple of years a go (5:2 and HIIT every other day) and have managed to keep it off and maintain my now normal BMI, if some creeps back on (if I cheat and get lazy with the exercise) I’ll do 3 days fast until evening meal 16:8 for 2 days, be more careful at weekends, and get moving more.. When I have Milk its always full fat but I’ve ditched Lattes for White Americano’s (less milk). I also read adding cream could be better as there is lower in carbs so doesn’t spike blood sugar as much and therefore insulin and thus fat storage. Its also more satiating so my curb appetite? However cream is obviously much more calorific so I would think it could be easily overdone, so I’m not totally convinced on this one- Anyone else have any thoughts on this?

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on 16:8 morning coffee replacement
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    How much milk are we talking about, and is it full fat (4%), semi skimmed (2%) or skimmed (0%)? Do you think it is the caffeine hit, or the ritual of the coffee you are struggling without?

  • posted by  lizzygirl66 on 16:8 morning coffee replacement
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    thanks recoveringfatty, I am loving the 16:8 eating method not having a problem with it at all but its my milky coffee that I am struggling with. I enjoy the herbal teas (no sugar its a baddy) but the morning coffee is hurting as I also rise very early in the morning. Well done on eliminating milk from your coffee, great effort. May I ask how long you have been on the 16:8 and how its affected your weight? 😀

  • posted by  GutLovingLife on What is your #1 challenge with your gut?
    on in Welcome
    permalink

    Hi! I’m doing some research for a project on guts and would love it if you could just give me a word or sentence about what your biggest challenge is at the moment – in relation to your gut. ie: bloat, IBS, leaky gut, SIBO, gut pain, constipation etc etc.
    Thanks! N

  • posted by  GutLovingLife on peeling chickpeas?
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Hi Melodious! I always recommend to peel chickpeas to help reduce gas, so I’d say that alone is a good reason why it’s a good idea to do this. In terms of roughage and fiber, the whole chickpea provides that anyway and you’re probably eating the houmous with crudites, or perhaps wholegrain? These will give you a good supply of extra fiber too 🙂 enjoy it!

  • posted by  recoveringfatty on 16:8 morning coffee replacement
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    I can’t see a problem with herbal teas as long as you don’t have sugar. Personally I went the black coffee route but it has to be good, fresh ground (I make mine in an aeropress) I used to drink it very milky. I’ve got used to the taste without and now enjoy it. How about green tea? Its a bit subtle for my palette but you might like it?

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on What book
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi Chalorre!

    I started with Michael Mosley’s ‘Clever Guts Diet’ book, but recently bought the ‘Fast800 Diet’ book. I likely have fatty liver, but am three weeks into reversing that (no alcohol down from loads of alcohol!). Today was my first big grocery shop since reading the second book.

    ‘Clever Guts’ is primarily for anyone with a digestive issues, not targeted at weight loss at all. It is a properly balanced and very varied Mediterranean style healthy eating programme. Phase One is about identifying and eliminating problem foods in a structured, scientific way. Snacking between meals is discouraged to ‘rest’ the digestive system, which would also support the liver as it regenerates and recovers.

    ‘Fast 800’ is the update to Dr Mosley’s 5:2 Fast Diet and perhaps also to his Blood Sugar Diet too. It is targeted at those who need to lose weight/ bodyfat to improve their health long term. It is a flexible, reduced carbohydrate Mediterranean style eating plan. There are three Stages to choose from: strict 800 cal a day for up to eight weeks, OR 800 cal a day twice a week, healthy reduced carbohydrate diet the other five days, OR maintenance/ slow weight loss.

    Whichever you go for, read and then reread the book. Show your own doctor/ nurse/ dietician the book and ask for their suggestions. Do not feel you need to go in ‘all guns blazing’. You sound determined to change for life, not a quick fix which is great!

    Many of us on the different Mosley diet forums have read two books, and are either combining or moving from one programme to another as our needs change. This is fine because Dr Mosley and his wife Dr Claire Bailey are both medical doctors who are ALL about health, balance and variety in our diet. Daily physical activity is also strongly encouraged. This does not have to be formal exercise if that is daunting.

    Do post any more questions, I will come by each day to check for you. 🙂

  • posted by  lizzygirl66 on 16:8 morning coffee replacement
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    hello all,
    I am about to embark on the 16:8 fasting and as I do love my coffee in the morning I was wondering whether herbal teas are an option to replace my milky coffee (not a big fan of black coffee). Any suggestions most welcome. Thank you 😀

  • posted by  Charlorre on What book
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Good morning, I have never written on any forum before so this information would be important to me.

    I have fatty liver and hypertension and need to get this under control, I do not want to take medication so I am going to try and sort these problems myself and have been looking at both books, 800 a day or good gut, does anyone know what the differences are.

    Thank you

  • posted by  wholefamilyprod on Some Very High Fibre Wholefoods!
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    Lovin’ your recipe dear! Thanks for giving us your recipe. I love foods with natural ingredients for it is good for our body. It makes us healthy and fit. I can’t wait to see your new recipes. Keep it up!

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Some Very High Fibre Wholefoods!
    on in Prebiotics
    permalink

    *BY WEIGHT*

    Baobab powder 54%
    Chia seeds 33%
    Cocoa powder 28%
    Cracked linseeds 24%
    Dessicated coconut 21%
    Cacao nibs 21%
    Pot barley 17%
    Pinhead oatmeal/ steel cut 11%

    *Check the packaging*Brands do vary*

  • posted by  Buhler on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thanks so much Steph, you have been a mine of information. Yes I tend to agree with you about the antibiotics. I think in this case it just has to be done.
    I’ll let you know how I get on once I start the treatment.

    Thanks again for all your input. It was you who put me on to Dr Caunes in the first place so I’m very grateful.

    Lyndal

  • posted by  melodious on peeling chickpeas?
    on in Mediterranean diet
    permalink

    Making hommus at home like it’s going out of fashion. Eating it from the jar like it’s icecream. Going to bed dreaming about spreading it on toasted green flaxseed bread (recipe in Clever Guts) for brekky the next morning…
    I’ve discovered that peeling the chickpeas makes my hommus one thousand times creamier and smoother and more hom-licious. (Tinned chickpeas, pop them out of their skins one by one. Adds an extra ten minutes to the process but it’s deeply satisfying.)
    My question is: how much does this change their nutritional value? I imagine a good bit of roughage is in those skins, but there’s also going to be a decent amount left in the peeled version, right? Any thoughts?

  • posted by  StephK on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Good question…I asked my tutors at college and they felt that in certain incidences where we have massive overgrowth and it’s a nasty pathogen, which strep and enterococcus both are, antibiotics are justified and quick to fix it. What we have been tested for is an overgrowth in the large colon, where all our bacteria should be. We probably have some degree of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth as well (SIBO). The colonic bacteria shouldn’t be in the small intestine but sometimes it gets relocated when there’s a serious overgrowth in the colon. I would be the first person to avoid antibiotics if I could but I believe it was the right course of treatment. The only other way you could approach it would be through a medical herbalist and to try various antimicrobial herbs. Personally I think it is a more definitive and fast “kill off” with the antibiotics and then you can work on repopulating the gut with the right bacterial strains and eating the right foods to encourage the right bacterial populations. Then effectively you get a new microbiome! Certainly with me, it worked quite quickly. Don’t stress about the drugs. Sometimes we just need them!

  • posted by  Buhler on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Yes I was just saying to my husband that if you didn’t know how to put together a meal with the foods your allowed it would be very hard to do the diet side of it, so yes I’m very fortunate that I can do that, and in fact even enjoy coming up with tasty things to eat.
    Sorry, but just one more question. I’ve been reading online about different ways to heal SIBO ( I guess that’s what I’ve got )and it appears lots of people do it without antibiotics, and say you shouldn’t use them. Grrrrrrr bloody Google can be so contradictory. You’re study to be a naturopath so what’s your take on this theory? Dr Caunes was very adamant that it was the only way to get rid of it.

    Cheers
    Lyndal

  • posted by  StephK on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    OMG Lyndal, you are so lucky to be a chef! You’ll know all the right things to make. That’ll be such a huge help.

    …I know what you mean about the carbs, I lost a heap of weight doing the diet..but felt really good. Amazing how when you reintroduce a few carb-ish things the kilos go back on …grrr. You may just have to be a walking skeleton for a few months…let me know how you go with everything and all the best!!

    Cheers
    Steph

  • posted by  Buhler on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thanks so much for putting my mind at ease Steph. I was really nervous about the whole antibiotic thing but felling more comfortable with it now.
    Luckily I’m a chef so have no problem coming up with good meal ideas. I have to do the whole low/no carb thing. Funnily enough I’ve always felt better on low carb but I just loose too much weight ( I’m on the slim side anyway) and I end up looking like a walking skeleton, so I try and have quite a few carbs to keep my weight up. But I’ll just have to suck it up for a few months and hopefully come out the other side feeling better.

    Thanks again for your help.

    Lyndal

  • posted by  StephK on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi Lyndal

    Wow, what great news…well not great that you have loads of strep but great you have a reason now for your problems!! I wouldn’t worry at all about the antibiotics. They’re a special slow release version of amoxycillin that stays in the gut a long time and seems to cause less systemic problems than the normal types. I had no problems at all and I’ve always had trouble with antibiotics in the past, big body rashes etc. Also if you have to wait a couple of months it won’t matter in the grand scheme of things. I waited at least 2 months before I got stuck in. Once you get used to what you’re doing it’s not so difficult and I felt really good on that diet so am sure you will too. I now have pretty perfect bowel function after 10 years of misery!!!!
    Funny that it’s strep, I’ve just got over 4 weeks of the worst strep infection I’ve ever had, all through the sinuses, ears and of course the throat! The choices were, take the antibiotics and mess up the gut again (arrrgggghhhh) or have damaged heart valves or kidney damage. I opted for the former!!! However luckily 3 1/2 weeks of antibiotics doesn’t seem to have adversely affected my poor gut so that’s good. Anyway strep is a nasty bug and you certainly don’t want to have an overgrowth of that!
    I found Selina, one of the naturopaths in with Dr Caunes, very helpful with adding in the right supplements (just a few) to support the protocol and helping me with food options. How to approach the eating regime etc. Of course you have to pay for her but 2 or 3 sessions with her were a great help…..
    I think you will get sick of making and consuming bone broth!!! I did!!!
    Anyway, great to hear you’re getting yourself sorted Lyndal….and have a great trip. Don’t let the food thing spoil it for you. Forget it and enjoy your time away and worry about it when you get back.
    Cheers
    Steph

    t

  • posted by  Buhler on Microbiome testing in New Zealand
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Hi Steph and Col,

    Just to let you know I’ve had my results from BioScreen back.
    It appears that I am in a very similar situation as you Steph in that I have a HUGE overgrowth. Mine was of Streptococcus. It’s at 99.6%. So I’m pretty much doing the same protocol as you. I have to say I’m very nervous about the antibiotics bit. I haven’t taken antibiotics for 30 years and the last time I did it made me feel so sick. But Dr Caunes said it’s the only way to knock this thing on the head and there is no natural alternative the would work.
    And unfortunately we are off next week to the States for two months so I won’t be able to start the program until I get back. In the meantime he said to do as low a carb diet as I can manage while travelling ( the USA is not known for its healthy food so this could be a challenge 😆).

    So here goes………. I think I’m going to be in for a rough ride but at least I now know what the problem has been for all these years.
    Any tips you have would be very helpful.

    Cheers
    Lyndal

  • posted by  JonoMarshall on Hello and a request for advice!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Thanks for the feedback, I’ll amend that question and remove ‘herbalist’, I’ll then replace ‘nutritionalist’ with ‘registered dietician’ and ‘registered nutritionalist’… the ‘other’ field can be used for any other suggestions.

    Did you feel there was anything else that needed amending?

    Thanks again.

  • posted by  Firefox7275 on Hello and a request for advice!
    on in Newbies
    permalink

    Completed with difficulty. Concern over your bias.

    Options in some cases channelled away from medical/ healthcare and skewed towards alternative fluff. What even is a nutritionalist? In Western countries mainstream protected titles in this field include registered dietician, nutritional therapist, registered nutritionist.

    Registering this because The Clever Guts Diet is written by medical and healthcare professionals and is evidence-based. If we follow the programme we could be working with various healthcare professionals (p.187-188). Lets not backslide into the ‘comfort blanket’ of alternative practitioners and their unscience.